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How to win at SEO with FAQ schema markup

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30-second summary:

  • According to Neil Patel, less than one percent of businesses take advantage of FAQ schema markups. 
  • There are several benefits schema markups provide to your overall SEO rankings. 
  • Implemented correctly, the FAQ schema markup can get your site into the featured snippets section of Google’s first page. 
  • Google has outlined which pages are eligible and which are prohibited from showing up as featured snippets in Google. 
  • FAQ schema markup added to quality, in-depth content can help to quickly improve your SEO score. 
  • Co-founder of Ally digital media, Abhishek Shah guides you through the process of setting up and implementing the FAQ schema markup to help improve your SEO. 

By implementing schema markup for your FAQ page, you can improve your website’s visibility as well as increase your website’s authority. 

Very few websites seem to be taking advantage of this easy, yet incredibly, effective SEO hack. According to Neil Patel, less than 1% of businesses online seem to be implementing this. So, now’s the time to get on board and ensure the schema markup is set up on your FAQ page. 

But first, let’s look at exactly what it is, and why it will improve your SEO. 

What is FAQ schema markup?

Schema markup is a powerful yet underused piece of code for SEO to help increase your website’s presence in the SERPs. 

This piece of code is placed on your website to help Google, and other search engines, to return better results for consumers. 

Search engines crawl your site, it gets indexed, and then when someone makes a relevant search your content may show up. What schema markup does is provides context to the content.  

Essentially, it removes some of the guessing search engines do when they crawl your site. A markup is able to provide context by telling the search engines what the content means. 

Schema.org explains it this way

“Most webmasters are familiar with HTML tags on their pages. Usually, HTML tags tell the browser how to display the information included in the tag. For example, <h1>Avatar</h1> tells the browser to display the text string “Avatar” in a heading 1 format. However, the HTML tag doesn’t give any information about what that text string means — “Avatar” could refer to the hugely successful 3D movie, or it could refer to a type of profile picture—and this can make it more difficult for search engines to intelligently display relevant content to a user.”

This is why the context provided by adding schema markup to your FAQ page, can help increase your presence in the search results. 

How an FAQ schema markup can help you win at SEO?

Having your FAQs in the featured snippets on Google can generate a huge lift in organic traffic. By adding the schema markup, you improve your chances of this happening. 

An important metric in SEO is CTR (click-through-rate). This is measured by the number of clicks divided by the number of impressions a result gets. For example, if you had 50 clicks and 800 impressions, your CTR would be 6.25%. 

If you can increase your CTR, it shows search engines that the page is relevant for that search term and it can help your website’s overall search ranking. 

Here’s one such example of Nested bean’s learn page that talks about sleep regression, implementation of FAQ schema helped them in doubling the CTR from 6.5% to 14%. 

Stats showing success of FAQ schema markup implementationSource: Google Search Console

By using an FAQ schema markup, you are increasing your website’s visibility by showing up for a wider variety of keywords. Which means more traffic to be potentially turned into paying customers. 

How to implement FAQ Schema?

The FAQ schema can be implemented in one of two ways: Microdata or JSON-LD. Whichever one you choose we strongly recommend you stick to that one. It’s not a good idea to mix them on a webpage. 

1. Microdata

This is the more complex of the two options. To implement schema markup with Microdata involves coding elements into your website. If you don’t have a web developer in your team this can be a rather tedious and challenging process where the code is added to the body section of your page. 

Here’s a microdata example for the FAQ page schema

<html itemscope itemtype=”https://schema.org/FAQPage”> 

<head> 

<title>Search Engine Marketing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) – Search Engine Watch</title> 

</head> 

<body> 

<div itemscope itemprop=”mainEntity” itemtype=”https://schema.org/Question”> 

<h3 itemprop=”name”>What is search engine marketing?</h3> 

<div itemscope itemprop=”acceptedAnswer” itemtype=”https://schema.org/Answer”> 

<div itemprop=”text”> 

<p>Search Engine Marketing helps put get your website onto page one of search engines when someone searches for something related to your industry.</p> 

</div> 

</div> 

</div> 

</body> 

</html> 

2. JSON-LD

Google recommends JSON-LD as “Google can read JSON-LD data when it’s dynamically injected into the page’s contents, such as by JavaScript code or embedded widgets in your content management system.” JSON-LD is certainly the easier of the two options, as this code is added to the header section of a page. 

Here’s a JSON-LD example for the FAQ page schema

<html>

<head> 

<title>Search Engine Marketing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) – Search Engine Watch</title> 

</head> 

<body> 

<script type=”application/ld+json”> 

{ 

“@context”: “https://schema.org”, 

“@type”: “FAQPage”, 

“mainEntity”: [ 

{ 

“@type”: “Question”, 

“name”: “What is Search Engine Marketing”, 

“acceptedAnswer”: { 

“@type”: “Answer”, 

“text”:”Search Engine Marketing helps put get your website onto page one of search engines when someone searches for something related to your industry.”} 

}] 

} 

</script> 

</body> 

</html> 

You can either write the code out from scratch, or you can copy the above code and use it as a template. Just be sure to remember to change out the content for your own. 

The outcome will look like this: 

Snippet example FAQ schema markupSource: Google 

How to validate FAQ schema implementation?

Validating your FAQ schema implementation is a simple three-step process. 

1. Test

To ensure you have implemented the code correctly on your page, you should use Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool. You can add your code snippet here, or the page URL and the testing tool will let you know if you’ve done it correctly or not. There is the added bonus that it will also provide any necessary feedback. 

2. Preview with Google’s Rich Result Tester

This tester will not only let you know if your page is eligible for rich results, but it will also show how the data will look in the SERPs. 

3. Recrawl the page

Once the code is added, and you have run the tests and the page is good to go there is one final step – requesting Google to re-index the page. 

To do this, you will need to log into Google Search Console and enter the modified URL in the top search bar and hit enter. Then you will want to select the option to request indexing. 

In some cases, you can see the effects kick in pretty quickly. Well, pretty quickly for search engines. If you’ve done this for a page that’s already ranking on page one, you should see the results update on the SERPS inside of 20 minutes. 

Which pages can the schema markup be applied to?

When considering adding the FAQ schema markup, it’s important to understand Google’s content guidelines. The first and most obvious guideline is that the page must have a list of questions with their answers attached. 

If your page has questions that users can submit their answers to, you want to use a different type of markup. Instead of using FAQPage, you would want to use QAPage: which is a different type of schema markup. 

Some valid uses of the FAQ schema markup are:

  • A page of FAQs written on the website. These pages have no way for users to submit alternative answers. 
  • Product support pages which list FAQs, that also have no way for users to submit different answers. 

 Some invalid uses of the FAQ schema markup are: 

  • Product support pages where users are able to submit their own answers to questions. 
  • Product pages that allow users to submit many questions and answers on a single page. 
  • Forum pages where users are able to answer questions themselves. 

You want to use the FAQ Schema markup for pages that are not time-sensitive. Also, Google’s guidelines strictly stipulate that you cannot use the FAQPage schema markup for advertising reasons. 

Other times when question and answer content won’t be displayed include if the following types of content are on the page: 

  • Profane 
  • Graphically violent 
  • Obscene 
  • Sexually explicit 
  • Hateful 
  • Illegal activities 

And finally, it is necessary for the FAQ content to be visible to the user on the FAQ page. All this means is you don’t want the content hidden from the user, or for the page to have a brief summary that links off to another page. 

What to include in the FAQ content on your page?

The FAQ schema markup code is quite easy to implement as we’ve shown above. Keep in mind, your FAQ content needs to meet all the usual SEO factors to work in concert with the schema markup. 

This includes aspects such as:

  • How relevant the content is to the topic
  • The page layout
  • How easy it is to read the content 

When you hear the phrase “readability”, it’s referring to a few things. The first is how easy is it to read? That is, are you varying your sentence lengths and using short paragraphs? 

The second is the font choice, as well as its color and size. When it comes to writing for an audience you want an easy font to read that’s a good size and color that doesn’t cause readers to strain their eyes. 

And finally, are you saying something? The best ranking FAQs are the ones that provide in-depth, useful answers. In-depth doesn’t always mean lots of words. If you can successfully (and meaningfully) answer a question in 50 words, that’s fine. 

It’s not about how many words you can write, it’s about how well you can answer a question and provide value.  

The advantage of good SEO-driven content with the right schema markup

By creating informative, well-written content that provides value to your website’s users, and then adding the correct schema markup, you can get yourself on page one of Google. And the more content you get on page one, the more traffic you drive to your site. 

The benefit of more traffic to your site is an increase in sales and subscriptions. 

Win at SEO with FAQ schema

If you want to give your website “the competitive advantage”, all you have to do is follow these simple steps. We recommend starting off with pages that are already ranking well to help get them either onto page one or to increase their real estate on page one. 

Good SEO has a snowball effect. The more content that drives quality traffic to your site, the better your overall SEO score. That is why it’s so important to boost your content efforts with schema markups. 

If you would like to know more about FAQ schema markup, just hit the comment button. 

Abhishek Shah is the co-founder of Ally Digital Media, a leading voice in digital media and marketing. He advocates for evidence-based marketing strategies to fuel the businesses. He can be found on Twitter @abiishek. 





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If you think you’re link building, you’re doing it wrong

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30-second summary:

  • Founder and CEO of Organic Growth, Kevin Carney interviewed 39 marketing professionals about their link building practices.
  • He has brilliantly condensed all these thoughts and highlighted a group of eight which is much more strategic about their link building.
  • More insights on what makes them unique and the most preferred link building platforms across the globe.

The hyperbolic title of this article is a conclusion I’ve come to after interviewing 39 people – with titles ranging from Marketing Specialist, Outreach Team Lead, Head of Content, to VP of SEO & Analytics, about their link building practices.

Of the 39 people, 23 work for agencies, 16 work for brands, and out of that group of 39, there are eight who do link building better, by approaching it differently.

So, what do they do that’s different?

First, lets please notice that this is an almost perfect 20/80 Pareto principle split, so kudos to Vilfredo Pareto, who first noticed how common this split is, way back in 1896.

The group of eight have the following in common:

1. It’s not about link building, it’s about something else

The best way I can think to describe this, is these people don’t do link building per se, they do some higher-level activity, which they take VERY seriously, and which includes the intention to attract high-quality links.

While their primary focus is on the higher-level activity, they are very aware of the importance of attracting links, and how their higher-level activity helps them do that.

2. It’s important in its own right

Did I mention they take this VERY seriously? The higher-level activity they do is not something they attend to when they can, it’s not something they “get to”. It is one of their highest marketing priorities. They devote resources to it, and in most cases wish they could devote more.

I think it’s also worth noting that of the group of eight, five are brands and three are agencies.

Examples of their higher-level activities

Below I identify the group of eight and provide a summary of what they do, and how they do it.

1. Matt Zajechowski of Digital Third Coast

Matt Zajechowski is an Outreach Team Lead and Content Marketing Promotions Specialist at Digital Third Coast, a Chicago based digital marketing agency. They work to position their clients as experts through digital public relations, and yes, I know everyone says that.

Early in the interview, Matt said,

“We do a lot of content-based linked building.”

But their idea of content is more involved than what others do.

They employ a primary tool of data-driven stories and articles, where the data comes from surveys involving 1,000 to 3,000 people. They don’t conduct the surveys themselves, but rather make use of online survey platforms such as SurveyMonkey and Amazon Mechanical Turk. These surveys run over the course of weeks and in some cases a few months.

The survey results provide patterns, trends, and stories with which to create highly unique content that provides insights not available elsewhere. The design of their surveys takes into account what articles are already published on the topic in question, as they work to avoid publishing something already covered by someone else.

As you can imagine, these articles make excellent link bait. Not because they are link bait per se, but because they’re good.

Their link building philosophy is that truly unique content, based on large sets of data that provide interesting insights, not only makes initial link building easier but soon attracts links without continued effort on their part.

2. Steve James, Freelance Marketing Consultant

Steve James is a freelance marketing consultant in Vancouver, British Columbia. Steve focuses on helping small, medium, and enterprise businesses.

What Steve does differently is to not focus on “what” to do, but rather to focus on “who” might be interested.

Steve said something I found to be a very interesting perspective:

“You need links to show you’re known by the right people.”

I can best illustrate his approach by sharing a story he told me to explain his approach.

Steve had a client who was a tailor who sold custom made suits. Rather than focus on building links to the tailor’s website per se, Steve thought about who cares about suits at all, let alone custom made suits.

Obviously, people who wear suits. So, who wears suits? Well, the mayor and the members of the City Council wear suits. The next question is, what can he do to get them to notice the tailor?

This resulted in content being published on the tailor’s website that was effectively written for the mayor and other city dignitaries and promoted to them.

This resulted in links from the city government website, and the mayor’s blogs. Being a local business, that was enough to lift the tailor’s website onto the first page of Google.

This led to a whole new market of online prospects, people who follow the Council members, and business professionals that wear suits.

Steve’s link building philosophy is not that he does a set of things related to building links, but he does whatever is appropriate to attract the attention of the right people.

3. Olga Mykhoparkina of Chanty

Olga Mykhoparkina former Chief Marketing Officer at Better Proposals Chanty, a software company that provides a team messaging tool similar to Slack and MS Team. They’re based in Zurich and Kharkiv, Ukraine. Their approach is public relations, where link building is a side effect of that.

Olga told me,

“We don’t really do anything to just get backlinks….. Links that we get are more of a side effect”.

Their larger effort is “to be known”, not to build links per se.

She then described how their main focus is on maintaining contact with journalists and answering questions of interest to these journalists.

They have people who monitor journalist requests on platforms such as HARO, SourceBottle, and JournoRequest, read every request and respond to every relevant inquiry. Any question they can answer, they do answer.

This is resulting in 20 to 50 quality backlinks per month, some from websites as authoritative as Forbes, American Express, and Business Insider.

This public relations work requires two full-time people.

Their link building philosophy is that by helping journalists, they greatly improve their exposure and their backlink profile.

4. Jamie Kehoe of Venturi

Jamie Kehoe, Former Content Manager at Venturi, an IT recruitment agency located in Manchester, England mentioned that their approach is community management, which helps them greatly with link building.

What encapsulates that idea is Jamie’s statement of,

“We’ve been nurturing this community…..”

A Slack channel is the hub of their community discussions, and their community management also includes content on their blog and a weekly podcast, Venturi’s Voice.

The discussions within their community are focused on teams; recruiting, building, nurturing, managing, and so on.

The podcast gives them unique content not available elsewhere, and each episode is an interview with someone solving problems in interesting ways.

The community management activities, including producing the podcast, are done by multiple people and works out to about two full-time equivalents.

Their link building philosophy involves generating unique interesting content to answer questions their community is asking.

5. Cécilien Dambon of Venngage

Cécilien Dambon is International Growth Manager at Venngage provides a software tool for making infographics and is based in Toronto, Ontario.

An interesting comment Cécilien said is,

“You send the same email to 100 people and you get a 3% conversion rate, and you send that same email super customized to ten people and you get the same result.”

So they focus on relationship building, and yes, I know everyone says that.

At Venngage this shows up as ten people in Venngage marketing maintaining a close relationship with people outside of Venngage with whom they do co-marketing. Co-marketing being a corporate buzzword for helping people who are also helping you.

They are proactive about doing favors for their friends without an expectation of payback for each and every favor.

Of course, there are limits. If someone they co-market with accepts favors and never returns them, that relationship is allowed to wither and is replaced with one that is more mutually beneficial.

This is not a dedicated function with Venngage marketing per se but by virtue of ten people maintaining co-marketing relationships with (give or take) 10 people each, their co-marketing network is strong.

Then when they need favors, they have a network of friends to ask for help.

Their link building philosophy can be summed up in that Beatles lyric: “With a little help from my friends”.

6. Miles Smith of Imaginasium

Miles Smith is Director of Digital & Inbound/Content Marketing at Imaginasium, an agency located in Green Bay, Wisconsin, specializing in helping manufacturing businesses.

Their focus is best summed up in the word “alignment”.

Miles said two things to me that I found to be of great interest:

Marketing is not simply creating demand for what is. It involves changing the business to best meet what demand exists.

Everything is link building, and links indicate the right people know about you.

Item two above is similar to the focus Steve James has on “who” rather than “what” and drives what content they publish, to whom they promote it, and how they promote it to them.

Their focus on “everything is link building” is the principle around which they organize their work.

While from this point on, things do look tactical for a while email outreach jumpstarts their link building, the alignment they worked on earlier helps their link building occur on its own faster, as they have less “content promotion inertia” to overcome.

As they’re an agency, the level of staffing required to make this happens depends upon what their client is paying for, but generally, for a client who takes this seriously, one to two full-time equivalents, consisting of bits and pieces of various team members (in-house and outsourced), are involved in this work.

Their link building philosophy is it’s important to be known by the right people.

7. Chris Eckstrum of Housecall Pro

Chris Eckstrum, former Manager of SEO at Housecall Pro, a company that provides software to tradespeople to help them run more efficient businesses. They’re located in San Diego, California.

They also focus on community management.

The hub of their community is two Facebook groups they own and manage. One is for home service professionals, the other is for women service professionals.

The groups are closed, in the sense that people need to ask to join and Housecall Pro vets them to make sure they are tradespeople, but the group is not limited to Housecall Pro customers. Any tradesperson can join.

Chris told me the discussions within the group provide them with content ideas as well as content amplification and links, as much of their content comes from discussions and interviews with group members, and all content is then shared with the group.

Their management of the groups is very active. They engage frequently with members.

Link building occurs primarily by members of their community directly linking to their content, as well as members of their community promoting the content with others.

Managing those two Facebook groups is a full-time job for two people.

Their link building philosophy is; links come fairly naturally from managing and nurturing their online communities.

8. Araks Nalbandyan of 10Web Inc

Araks Nalbandyan is the Director of Digital Marketing at 10Web an agency that builds, manages, and hosts WordPress websites. They’re based in Newark, Delaware.

They are the exception within this group of eight, as they do what the rest of us do, but more so, and better, which primarily means with a high degree of personalization.

Their primary link building strategy is content promotion via email.

By “more so”, I mean they have two people doing it full time, and by “better” I mean that every pitch is highly personalized. They do not send mass emails.

The degree to which this is true is illustrated by how Araks described the training of the people who do link building. The very first pitch they compose can take four hours to draft. Over time, they get better at it, and four months later they’re able to craft a highly customized pitch in 20 minutes.

What they’re doing is highly customized email pitches at volume, which I am differentiating from the sending of mass email, which is generally very slightly customized by the use of templates.

The other thing they do differently from the bulk of us is they actually and rigorously track their outreach attempts and results, and adjust based on that feedback. They do this in part with the reporting capability of the email product they use (Lemlist), and in part by dumping data from various sources into Google Data Studio and generating information from the data.

She said one that really caught my attention,

“The main reason I separate the Content Promotion (from other link building tactics) is because of the open rate, the click-through rate, and the answer rate of those kinds of emails are super high. One of our campaigns reached an open rate of about 78%, which was huge, and we got a lot of responses and a lot of links from that.”

Their link building philosophy has two prongs:

  1. Highly personalized email pitches are worth the effort.
  2. You can’t manage what you don’t measure.

The rest of us are focused on the tactical aspects of link building

Which it appears, is not an effective way to build links at scale. The other 31 people I interviewed aren’t doing link building wrong per se, they’re just being less effective. Their efforts build links, but not on the same scale.

From talking with this group of people, the “issue” if that’s the right word, is their link building approach is much more tactical, and not as strategic as the group of eight listed above.

The group of eight is much more strategic about their link building (by considering it to be part of a higher-level activity) and much more tactical about their higher-level activity, which is what they attend to in their daily to-do lists.

And I appreciate their contribution to this article

For the record, the group of people I interviewed above and beyond the group of eight is:

Agencies

  • Olivier Mamet of Sandbox, located in Mauritius
  • Nick Bennett of Growmeo Marketing, in Phoenix, Arizona
  • Brooks Manley of Egenius, in Greenville, South Carolina
  • Sam White of New Dimension Marketing & Research, in Encinitas, California
  • Greg Heilers of Jolly Content, in Walnut Creek, California
  • Djordje Milicevic of StableWP, in Toronto, Ontario
  • Syed Irfan Ajmal of SyedIrfanAjmal.com, in Peshawar, Pakistan
  • Kyle Douglass of Revium, in Melbourne, Australia
  • Andy Nathan of Smart at the Start, in Chicago, Illinois
  • Jonathan Aufrey of Growth Hackers, in Taipei, Taiwan
  • Amine Rahal of IronMonk Solutions, in Toronto, Ontario
  • Markelle Harden of Knowmad Digital Marketing, in Fort Mill, South Carolina
  • David Kranker of David Kranker Creative, in Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Kyle Kasharian of 9Saill, in Fairfield, New Jersey
  • Dean Cacippo of One Click SEO, in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Cory Hedgepeth of Direct Online Marketing, in Wexford, Pennsylvania
  • Jonathan Gorham of Engine Scout, in South Yarra, Australia
  • Irena Zobniów of Insightland.org, in Wroclaw, Poland
  • Celest Huffman of Rocket Web, in Nashville, Tennessee

Brands

  • Shejraj Singh of YoStarter, in Punjab, India
  • Michael Anderson of Geolango Maps, in Pleasanton, California
  • Slisha Kankariya of With Clarity, in New York City
  • Christina Sanders of Lucidpress, in Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Erin Osterhaus of CORT, in Austin, Texas
  • Patrick Whatman of Spendesk, in Paris, France
  • Matt Bassos of Vuly Play, in Brisbane, Australia
  • Dana Roth of FortVision, in Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Quincy Smith of Ampjar, in Shanghai, China
  • Taavi Rebane of Messente Communications, in Tartu, Estonia
  • Praveen Malik of PMbyPM, in Delhi, India
  • Jakub Kliszczk of CrazyCall, of Wroclaw, Poland

The software tools used

I thought it would be interesting to know what software tools are used for their link building activities, so I asked and compiled this list.

In the spirit of full disclosure, these are the tools people thought to mention to me when I asked, and I tried not to ask leading questions. As such, it’s possible some people simply didn’t feel that a tool such as Google Sheets was worthy of mention, whereas others did.

What surprised me is that neither Majestic SEO nor Google Custom Search Queries get much respect.

Below is a list of each software tool, and the number of people who said they use it.

  • Ahrefs: 27
  • SEMRush: 21
  • Google Sheets: 15
  • BuzzStream: 8
  • io: 8
  • MozPro: 6
  • Screaming Frog: 5
  • Mailshake: 4
  • VoilaNorbert: 4
  • Google Custom Search Queries: 3
  • MajesticSEO: 3
  • HubSpot: 2
  • MozBar: 2
  • SimilarWeb: 2
  • Trello: 2
  • Answer the Public: 1
  • Asana: 1
  • Boomerang: 1
  • Cision: 1
  • Cora: 1
  • Google Calendar: 1
  • io: 1
  • LemList: 1
  • Link Prospector: 1
  • com: 1
  • PitchBox: 1
  • io: 1
  • Scrapebox: 1
  • SEO Power Suite: 1
  • SEOquake: 1
  • org: 1
  • Spyfu: 1
  • Ubersuggest: 1

The tactics employed

I also asked people about their link building tactics, but since seeing that the difference that makes the difference is not one’s tactical approach to link building, but rather one’s tactical approach to their higher-level activity, I fear I would be leading you astray by publishing this list.

In spite of the fact that I met everyone but one person through HARO, I was surprised to discover how many people consider HARO to be a valuable link building tactic. It was the third most popular tactic, by a long shot.

Below are the top three, and the number of people who stated they use it.

  • Content promotion via email: 24
  • Guest blogging: 23
  • HARO: 18

The fourth most popular tactic was used by only 8 people.

In closing

Link building at scale requires resources. Some companies, even some larger companies, do not devote the one or two full-time equivalents required to do it effectively.

If, due to resource constraints, you can’t be one of the top tier link building players, the way you emulate them is:

Devote bits of pieces of lots of people to make up as many full-time equivalents as you can. Since your more successful competitors are devoting appropriate resources, you’ve got to compensate or be left behind.

Prioritize that work as important enough to get to, even if that requires something else to be less important, and yes, I know that is easier said than done.

While each email might start with a template, make each email highly personalized to the person you’re sending it to. Based on the people I spoke to for this article, fewer highly personalized emails have greater success than mass emails where the personalization is just what’s done in the template.

Kevin Carney is the Founder and CEO of the boutique link building agency Organic Growth.



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How to increase organic traffic: 14 Practical tips

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30-second summary:

  • Organic traffic is the best shareware way to attract visitors who already want to make a deal. You should conduct a good SEO analysis and take care of the quality of your site to increase it.
  • You can get more organic visits if you develop a strategy, eliminate technical errors of your site, use its good mobile version, make correct external and internal optimization, optimize URLs, update the site content regularly, develop a blog with unique content, analyze competitors, and promote your site through social networks, press releases, newsjacking, emails, and messengers.
  • The correct implementation of the above-mentioned tasks will provide a long-lasting result for you.

Ordinary users trust SERP more than advertising and links marked as “ads”. Correctly performed optimization, troubleshooting and the use of promising channels will quickly bring a good result.

14 Practical tips to increase organic traffic

You can get organic visits using a set of working methods, tools, and recommendations. The best 14 ways are summarized in the review below. 

1. Developing a strategy to increase organic traffic

The solution to any problem begins with the development of a strategy to leave room for financial and time planning. Strategy development is carried out in stages:

  • You should set goals and objectives at first
  • Then, identify weaknesses using a comprehensive site audit and analyze the competitive environment
  • As the next step, you can eliminate identified errors and problems
  • Also, you need to select priority methods to attract organic traffic and increase the position of the site in SERP
  • Then, map the work and budget, prepare a content plan (golden rule for a content plan – 60/30/10 – third-party content 60%, unique content 30%, advertising 10%)
  • If you need, you should select specialists and form technical tasks
  • As the last step, perform tasks, analyze results using Google Analytics

Attracting organic traffic is a rather lengthy process that distinguishes it from contextual advertising. Ads start working immediately after launch. However, organic traffic will work for a long time without any additional investments. 

2. Elimination of technical errors of the site

You can identify and eliminate technical errors of the site using the following methods:

  • Surface self-check
  • Comprehensive site audit with the help of professionals
  • Usage of paid and free services. It’s an optimal solution for those who want to get a quick result with minimal financial investments. Services allow you to identify SEO errors and ones in other key positions. The best of them are Semrush, Ahrefs, and SEOptimizer

You should eliminate identified errors by yourself or with the help of professionals. It’ll make your website more attractive to users and search engines. After the site audit, you can get rid of duplicates, speed up the download of the site, identify affiliates, and solve other problems. 

3. Mobile version of the site

More than 65% of internet users prefer to select and order products from mobile devices. You can’t lose such a huge audience and should take care of your site mobile version. It allows you to increase target audience coverage several times, increase sales and subscriptions. You can create a separate mobile version or use an adaptive design of your main site. In the last case, there will be an automatic adjustment to the screens of different devices. 

4. Correct external and internal website optimization

External optimization

It’s aimed to obtain links from third-party sites. External links that aren’t protected from indexing transfer a part of a donor weight to the acceptor site. When working on building an external link mass, you should consider:

  • Donor site trust, spam level of backlinks. The first index should be high, the second one – low
  • Rules of posting links. It’s recommended to surround them with content
  • Donor site topics (should be related)
  • Frequency of placement. You should increase the link juice gradually. It’s especially important for young sites that have a low level of trust in search engines. A sharp increase can lead to the pessimization of the acceptor site

Internal optimization

It helps to make the site relevant to those queries you carry out the promotion. It consists of:

  • Keyword list collection
  • Keywords grouping
  • Preparing and publishing content optimized with LSI and SEO
  • Formation and optimization of meta tags: title and description, headings and subheadings, image tags
  • Creation of robots.txt files and sitemap.xml (if it’s not generated automatically)
  • Interlinking and other related work

It’s important to ensure that meta tags and content are supplemented with relevant keywords but are not spammed. Otherwise, you can fall under search engine filters.

5. URLs optimization

You can complement URLs with keywords. It makes them more understandable for website visitors. When optimizing URLs, it’s recommended:

  • Use from three to five relevant words, longer links will be cut off in the SERP
  • Use hyphens rather than underscores
  • Take into account spam indicators. Keywords from URLs are added to the overall frequency on the page

Optimized URLs look more attractive so visitors click on them more likely. 

6. Regular content updates

Content updates are a rather important factor which influences on ranking. We speak about updating previously posted materials as well as publishing new ones. It helps to keep pace, increase credibility, have a positive effect on indexing. 

You should carry out updates regularly following the content plan. It allows you to work with new keywords and attract organic traffic from search engines. 

7. Blogging

A blog is a valuable resource necessary for attracting organic traffic not only for commercial but also for information requests. We used to carefully choose the goods before the deal. A blog with interesting and relevant content increases chances that after reading the review, the visitor will perform the target action.

On the blog, you can publish news, information materials, as well as infographics, video reviews – everything that can attract attention and encourage visitors to make a deal. When writing articles for a blog, you can use the links to the catalog. So that the client can immediately buy the product they like without spending time searching the site.

8. Expertise and uniqueness of the content

Usage of non-unique content is a deliberately losing thing. As a result of it, you can get a claim from the copyright holder. Therefore, it’s necessary to create and optimize your content that will provide organic visits. This rule applies not only to texts but also to photos, pictures, videos. In the case of publishing someone else’s content, you must obtain the permission of the copyright holder and give a link to the source.

There is one more caveat – expertise, which plays an important role in ranking issues. Search engines don’t focus on quality optimization but on the semantic uniqueness and benefit that the content of the site can bring to the visitor. The content should answer the question that the user enters in the search bar. If the materials contain outdated, uninteresting, or knowingly untruthful data, the visitor will leave the site. An increasing number of failures will hurt ranking.

9. Promotion in social networks

Social networks are an effective tool with which you can manage opinions and drive traffic to your website. You can create a group for communication with potential customers and publish their announcements, information about promotions, discounts, updates of the assortment, and other content that encourages them to click on the link. Before starting the campaign on social networks, you need to analyze groups of your competitors, look at the situation with ordinary user’s eyes. If the posts are interesting, the subscribers will start to like and share them. This will provide additional free advertising and reach.

10. Competitive analysis

To be the first, you should know what is happening in the competition. To solve this problem, you need to use an audit which will help:

  • Define a keywords cluster
  • Keep abreast of all events, updates and new products introduced by competitors
  • Form advertising budgets and solve other strategic tasks

For audit, you can use online services, questionnaires, secret shoppers, newsletter subscription, analysis of social networks groups, and other tools. You can use the information you’ve got to improve and optimize your website.

11. Press releases on third party resources

Regular publication of press releases on popular sites will help to solve several problems. The first one is traffic attraction, the second – external optimization. News sites visitors click the links willingly. The only negative aspect is that it’s difficult to place such publications. You should make the most of your efforts to get a positive result in outreach and lead generating.

12. Using newsjacking

Newsjacking is one of the varieties of guerrilla marketing that provides unobtrusive advertising. The latter is served against the background of an important event not being a priority. The plus is that users will often visit the site using both search queries and aggregators or news portals. The main rule is to link the offer with a really interesting and important event. Otherwise, the tool will not work. 

13. Email marketing setup

From year to year, newsletters demonstrate their effectiveness. They allow you not only to communicate with customers but also to receive visits to the site. To configure the newsletter, you must have your contact base. To collect the latter, you need to place a simple registration or subscription form on the site consisting of a minimum number of lines. After that, you can establish communication with customers, notifying them of promotions, catalog updates, and other important events.

14. Mailing in messengers

Mailing in messengers is similar to emails. However, messages in Facebook Messenger, Snapchat, or WhatsApp have a higher percentage of opening. A smartphone is always near the person, such messages are more familiar and convenient. Therefore, you should not ignore the potential of this channel. Before starting such mailing, it’s necessary to ask the client whether he/she doesn’t mind receiving advertising materials. Otherwise, the sender (you) may be blocked.

To round up

Correct external and internal optimization, work in social networks and messengers, competitive analysis, technical errors eliminating, and usability improving is priority tasks to increase organic traffic. You can perform some tasks on your own. Other ones will have to be entrusted to professionals. The correct implementation of these tasks will provide a long-lasting result, an increase in organic traffic, sales, and an influx of hot customers.



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Bing Maps API, Google and YouTube ads and targeted SEO

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