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WordPress 5.3 Moves Closer to Valid HTML

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WordPress 5.3 Moves Closer to Valid HTML


WordPress announced that version 5.3 will use improved coding that will be closer to standards compliant HTML. There are good reasons why it valid HTML should be considered important for SEO.  While the WordPress HTML will not be 100% valid, this update is a step in the right direction.

The release date is tentatively scheduled for November 12, 2019. For many this might seem like too little and too late. Nevertheless, WordPress is arguably the most important content management system at the moment. This means that attaining valid HTML for a website is closer now for a great many sites across the web.

WordPress 5.3 Fixes Type Attribute Issue

The improvement is focused on how script and style tags are coded. Prior to HTML5, it was mandatory to use the “type” attribute to tell browsers that the script or style was text.

HTML5 eliminated the need for the “type” attribute. The change caused HTML5 sites that continued using the “type” attribute to render as invalid HTML.

Different Levels of Validation Messages

There are different levels of validation messages. There are warnings, which are considered relatively minor and there are errors, which are more important.

This coding error resulted in a validation warning but did not trigger an error message. Perhaps because it was seen as a harmless oversight the invalid code continued to be present in WordPress.

Official WordPress Announcement

This is how the official WordPress announcement described what is changing in version 5.3:

“In HTML5, the type attribute is not required for the <script> and <style> tags. Including the attribute on these tags (type="text/javascript", for example) will trigger a validation warning in HTML validation tools.

In WordPress 5.3, two new arguments are now supported for the html5 theme feature, script and style. When these arguments are passed, the type attribute will not be output for those tags.”

Why HTML Validation Matters

HTML is a programming language with rules. Initially, bots and browsers functioned best when the rules were followed. But developer demands outpaced the rules. So developers bent the rules.

Search engines and browsers needed the content so developers adapted to non-conforming HTML.

Yet, the best way to communicate data has always been to give the browsers and search engines valid HTML because when you follow the rules there is less chance of a mistake happening.

The essence of SEO, the heart of it, is to communicate information to users and search engines.

Anything that muffles your message, that makes it harder to understand your message, works against you. Invalid HTML works against your message.

Poor HTML markup does not necessarily block your message (although in certain cases it can). But it does makes it harder to communicate it.

Type Attribute Issue is Commonly Downplayed

Many in the publishing and SEO community regard the type attribute warning as a minor issue. In a discussion thread from 2017, a senior member of WebmasterWorld observed:

“Also note that it’s flagged as a “warning”, not as an “error”. That means nothing bad will happen even if you leave it unchanged; it’s more of an FYI.”

Screenshot of a webmasterworld forum member downplaying the type attribute validation warning

That member’s attitude of downplaying the invalid code is common throughout the industry and with good reason.

As long as Google can overlook it then this kind of problem can go unfixed. There is always something more important to focus on than a seemingly minor HTML coding error.

But there’s more to this issue in the form of what’s known as browser quirks mode.

Valid WordPress HTML Code is Important to SEO

Another member pointed out that invalid code has the potential to trigger what’s known as “quirks mode” in a browser.

Quirks mode is when a browser begins trying to interpret the invalid code in a manner that may result in a useful web page. It’s a way to compensate for bad code.

Quirks mode can cause unpredictable web page rendering and in unlucky circumstances result in a web page that does not function correctly.

This is the reason why maintaining valid HTML code is important for SEO. Part of good SEO is controlling for every aspect of how a web page renders for users and for bots.

In general, invalid code has the potential to cause a cascading series of errors that can impact speed, conversions, bounce rates and even indexing.

The potential is widely considered remote, but it can’t be ruled out.

All it takes is a script or a plugin to play badly with another script (while the browser is in quirks mode), to cause unintended consequences.

Even though the above scenario may be remote, it’s a good practice to lock down every factor that contains a potential for error. That’s good SEO.

Screenshot of a webmasterworld forum discussion.

WordPress 5.3 HTML Improvement is Important

I asked HTML and SEO expert Edward Lewis for his thoughts on WordPress fixing the type attribute error:

“It is a BIG deal. It will eliminate a gajillion warnings from validation routines. Some sites will now go green and be 100% valid since they’ve failed to heed the warnings.”

I agree with Edward Lewis. WordPress finally removing the “type” attribute in <script> and <style> tags is indeed a big deal.

WordPress Ticket Timeline

The WordPress development team has been aware of this issue since almost two years ago. A WordPress ticket was opened 23 months ago about this issue.

About three months ago Sergey Biryukov (@SergeyBiryukov)  appeared to take notice and about four weeks ago updated the status of the ticket.

Screenshot of a WordPress development ticket

WordPress 5.3 Contains Many Improvements

The improvements coming in WordPress version 5.3 aren’t limited to this one fix. There are numerous changes in WP 5.3 that may be important to developers.

But this change will directly affect publishers, developers and those in the SEO community.

It’s encouraging to see the WordPress development team pushing WordPress that much closer to outputting valid HTML code. WordPress 5.3 will be good for publishers and for SEO.

Read the announcement here:
https://make.wordpress.org/core/5-3/

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Here’s how to set up the Google Site Kit WordPress plugin

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Here's how to set up the Google Site Kit WordPress plugin


On Oct. 31, Google announced the launch of its Site Kit WordPress plugin that, “enables you to set up and configure key Google services, get insights on how people find and use your site, learn how to improve, and easily monetize your content.”

This plugin allows you to easily connect the following Google Services in a dashboard format within your WordPress backend:

  • Search Console
  • Analytics
  • PageSpeed Insights
  • AdSense
  • Optimize
  • Tag Manager

It brings the convenience of accessing your site’s performance data while logged into the backend of the site. This is great for webmasters, developers and agencies who are often an admin for their own site or a client’s WordPress site. However, it does not offer the robust and dynamic capabilities of a Google Data Studio report or dashboard to sort data so it may not be ideal for a digital marketing manager or CMO.

With that said, it wouldn’t hurt to implement this plugin as it’s actually a nifty tool that can help you stay on top of your site’s performance metrics. It’s also another way to give Google more access to your site which can have some in-direct benefits organically. 

Here is what the Google Site Kit plugin looks like within the WordPress plugin directory.

Installing and setting up Google Site Kit

To utilize the plugin, simply click install and activate as you would any other WordPress plugin. You will then be prompted to complete the set up.

Step 1

Click on the “Start Setup” button.

Step 2

You will be prompted to give access to your site’s Google Search Console profile, which means you need to sign in to the Gmail account that has access to your site’s Search Console profile.

Step 3

Once logged in you need to grant permissions for Google to access the data in your Search Console profile.

Step 4

Once you’ve granted all the respective permissions, you will get a completion notification and can then click on “Go to my Dashboard.”

Step 5

Once you’re in the Dashboard you will see options to connect other services such as Analytics, AdSense and PageSpeed insights. You can now choose to connect these services if you like. If you go to the settings of the plugin you will see additional connection options for Optimize and Tag Manager.

Here is what the dashboard looks like with Search Console, analytics and PageSpeed Insights enabled. You can see a clear breakdown of the respective metrics.

The plugin allows you to dive into each reporting respectively with navigation options on the left to drill down into Search Console and analytics.

There is also an admin bar feature to see individual page stats.

In summary, this is a great plugin by Google but keep in mind it’s just version 1.0. I’m excited to see what features and integrations the later versions will have!


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.


About The Author

Tony Edward is a director of SEO at Tinuiti and an adjunct instructor of search marketing at NYU. Tony has been in the online marketing industry for over 10 years. His background stems from affiliate marketing and he has experience in paid search, social media and video marketing. Tony is also the founder of the Thinking Crypto YouTube channel.

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Bing Announces Link Penalties – Search Engine Journal

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Roger Montti


Bing announced a new link penalties. These link penalties are focused on taking down private blog networks (PBNs), subdomain leasing and manipulative cross-site linking.

Inorganic Site Structure

An inorganic site structure is a linking pattern that uses internal site-level link signals (with subdomains) or cross-site linking patterns (with external domains) in order to manipulate search engine rankings.

While these spam techniques already existed, Bing introduced the concept of calling them “inorganic site structure” in order to describe them.

Bing noted that sites legitimately create subdomains to keep different parts of the site separate, such as support.example.com. These are treated as belonging to the main domain, passing site-level signals to the subdomains.

Bing also said sites like WordPress create standalone sites under subdomains, in which case no site level signals are passed to the subdomains.

Examples of Inorganic Site Structure

An inorganic site structure is when a company leases a subdomain in order to take advantage of site-level signals to rank better. There have been

Private blog networks were also included as inorganic site structure

Domain Boundaries

Bing also introduced the idea of domain boundaries. The idea is that there are boundaries to a domain. Sometimes, as in the case of legitimate subdomains (ex. support.example.com), those boundaries extend out to the subdomain. In other cases like WordPress.com subdomains the boundaries do not extend to the subdomains.

Private Blog Networks (PBNs)
Bing called out PBNs as a form of spam that abuse website boundaries.

“While not all link networks misrepresent website boundaries, there are many cases where a single website is artificially split across many different domains, all cross-linking to one another, for the obvious purpose of rank boosting. This is particularly true of PBNs (private blog networks).”

Subdomain Leasing Penalties

Bing explained why they consider subdomain leasing a spammy activity:

“…we heard concerns from the SEO community around the growing practice of hosting third-party content or letting a third party operate a designated subdomain or subfolder, generally in exchange for compensation.

…the practice equates to buying ranking signals, which is not much different from buying links.”

At the time of this article, I still see a news site subdomain ranking in Bing (and Google). This page belongs to another company. All the links are redirected affiliate type links with parameters meant for tracking the referrals.

According to Archive.org the subdomain page was credited to an anonymous news staffer. Sometime in the summer the author was switched to someone with a name who is labeled as an expert, although the content is still the same.

So if Bing is already handing out penalties that means Bing (and Google who also ranks this page) still have some catching up to do.

Cross-Site Linking

Bing mentioned sites that are essentially one site that are broken up into multiple interlinking sites. Curiously Bing said that these kinds of sites already in violation of other link spam rules but that additional penalties will apply.

Here’s the kind of link structure that Bing used as an example:

illustration of a spammy link networkAll these sites are interlinking to each other. All the sites have related content and according to Bing are essentially the same site. This kind of linking practice goes back many years. They are traditionally known as interlinked websites. They are generally topically related to each other.

Bing used the above example to illustrate interlinked sites that are really just one site.

That link structure resembles the structure of interlinked websites that belong to the same company. If you’re planning a new web venture, it’s generally a good idea to create a site that’s comprehensive than to create a multitude of sites that are focused on just a small part of the niche.

Curiously, in reference to the above illustration, Bing said that kind of link structure was already in violation of link guidelines and that more penalties would be piled on top of those:

“Fig. 3 – All these domains are effectively the same website.
This kind of behavior is already in violation of our link policy.

Going forward, it will be also in violation of our “inorganic site structure” policy and may receive additional penalties.

Takeaway

It’s good news to hear Bing is improving. Competition between search engines encourage innovation and as Bing improves perhaps search traffic may become more diversified as more people switch to Bing as well as other engines like DuckDuckGo.

Read Bing’s announcement: Some Thoughts on Website Boundaries



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Google Releases its Site Kit WordPress Plugin Out of Beta

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Matt Southern


Google has released version 1.0 of its Site Kit plugin for WordPress, which means its officially out of beta after 6 months.

In the time since the developer preview of Site Kit was released, Google says it drastically simplified the setup, fixed bugs, and polished the main user flows.

Site Kit allows WordPress users to access data from Google products right from their site’s dashboard. The plugin aggregates data from Google Search Console, Google Analytics, PageSpeed Insights, and AdSense.

Google Releases its Site Kit WordPress Plugin Out of Beta

With Site Kit there’s no additional code editing required, which makes it easy to set up products like Google Analytics for those without any developer experience.

Anyone can install Site Kit, but Google emphasizes that it’s especially useful for professionals who work on sites for clients. The reasons why include:

  • Clients and other teams can easily access data from Google products by logging into the WordPress dashboard.
  • Clients will see performance states and improvement recommendations directly from Google
  • Site Kit allows you to set roles and permissions and make sure only relevant people can see the data.

To get the most out of Site Kit, Google recommends reviewing the main dashboard on at least a weekly basis. You can also check the stats of individual pages by navigating to the page and clicking on Site Kit in the admin bar.

Google Releases its Site Kit WordPress Plugin Out of Beta

With this data, Google recommends comparing the top performing pages and seeing how people found them. This can help you discover trends, such as which topics get the most engagement on Twitter, which get the most engagement on Facebook, and so on.

To get started with Site Kit, simply install it from your WordPress dashboard.



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