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Tips for Organizing Your Wistia Channel

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It’s a problem most of us marketers face — we have a lot of great videos on our site, but find it difficult to showcase many of them in a way that attracts more viewers. It’s a problem we’ve experienced here at Wistia over the years (and one we’ve heard our customers talk a lot about, too). That’s why we created Wistia Channels — from a binge-worthy video series to customer support videos, product announcements, and more, Wistia Channels makes it super easy to get up and running in no time.

If you’re wondering how Wistia Channels can help you display your content in a cohesive and engaging way right on your website, then you’ve come to the right place! First, let’s dig into how you actually organize videos on your Channel within your account.

In order to create a Channel, you’ll first need to start with a Wistia Project that contains all of the related videos you’ll want to display. If you’re creating a Channel that’s focused on an episodic series, for example, you’ll want to have every episode of the series in that Project.

To create a new Project, simply select New Project from the Actions menu. Remember, if you want to move videos from one Project to another, use the Move & Copy feature. Once you have all the videos you want in your Project, it’s time to organize how it’s all displayed! You can create Sections to organize the videos within your Project. Each new section will appear as a new row within your Channel.

project
Check out those sections! Lookin’ great.

Create a new Section in your Project by going to the Project Actions dropdown menu and selecting New Section. Edit the section name, and either upload or drag and drop videos into this section. Videos will appear in the same order in your Channel as the order they’re listed in your Project, so be sure to move around the videos in your section accordingly! Take a look at how your Channel is shaping up by clicking on Project Actions and selecting View as Channel from the dropdown menu.

Now that you’ve seen a preview of your Channel in the wild, you may want to consider mixing up the layout depending on what content you’re showcasing. Choose between a Carousel or Grid format by clicking on Layout. The Carousel format is great if you have a large number of videos in each section of your Channel and want viewers to be able to scroll through easily. The Grid format, on the other hand, shows all thumbnails in a section in, well, a grid — no scrolling necessary. We recommend using this when you don’t have a ton of videos but want to clearly and prominently feature them.

Want to make your Wistia Channel shine? Check out this post for more tips on how to customize your Channel even further.

Excellent! You’ve got your Channel set up within your account, you’re ready to get a little more strategic about how you want to lay out your content. The possibilities are endless, but here we’ve got some examples that will help get your wheels turning!

Episodic video series

Working on a sweet new video series that has multiple episodes? Sounds great!
Klaviyo, a business that helps ecommerce brands drive more growth, created an original docu-series called Beyond Black Friday that follows the marketing campaigns of three brands, and what they’re doing differently. They cleverly organized their series’ Channel by creating a section that focuses on the videos for each brand, making it easy for viewers to follow along. The last row of their Channel features bonus content, like the series trailer and an AMA panel with the cast.

For viewers who may not be ready to dive into the entire docuseries, they have the opportunity to check out bite-sized clips and get to know the content a bit more before committing. Featuring additional, behind-the-scenes content on your Channel is a great way to drum up engagement and keep viewers watching (and wanting) more!

Educational videos

If you’re sitting on a pile of awesome educational videos that need a little more love, then this one’s for you. You can use Channels to display your content however you’d like — whether you want to showcase your videos in a linear, step-by-step fashion, or in a way that lets viewers jump around and consume in whatever order they like. At the end of the day, it’s all about organizing your content in a way that puts the smallest burden on the viewer.

Take, for example, The Beginner’s Guide to Video Production Channel on our site. We organized the sections by sequential subtopics — Part 1, for example, groups videos that are focused on a particular theme together, like “Preparing for Your Shoot.” Part 2 is centered around “How to Use Your Camera” and Part 3 is all about “Understanding Audio Basics.” As you can see, when displaying educational videos, you want to think about the journey your viewer takes when they land on your Channel. If you’re just starting out on your video production journey, you’re going to want to know what you need to prepare for your shoot before you start shooting.

Customer support videos

When it comes to customer support videos, organization is key. Think of the last time you were looking for an answer to a problem on a company’s website. Chances are, you probably spent at least 10 minutes surfing around to find what you were really looking for. Maybe you even gave up on finding the answer yourself and decided to reach out to their customer support team instead.

Keep your support tickets down by taking the time to make your Channel as clear and organized as possible. If you have access to data around what questions people ask most frequently, why not make a section that covers all of the issues right at the top of the page? Placester, a business platform for real estate professionals, uses sections to group videos in their Channel by support subtopic, making it easy for users to find exactly what they’re looking for.

Conference or event videos

Many businesses host annual conferences where they unveil new and exciting updates to their products and even highlight tips and tricks of the trade on a large scale to big audiences. However, conferences can be expensive and not everyone can travel to far off places to attend. Luckily, Channels make it easy for businesses to showcase their conference videos and sessions online so no one misses out! Workforce Software, a business that creates cloud-based workforce management software, uses a Channel to showcase videos from their annual conference, VISION.

Using a Channel to display your company conference videos is a great way to show prospective attendees a taste of what they’ll experience if they register for your next conference. It’s easy to group these videos in sequential order or use Sections to group event videos by theme or topic.

If you have a series of product launch or update videos, adding them to a Wistia Channel is an awesome way to keep them organized and accessible to all. We feature all of our product launch videos on a Channel with rows that are organized by type of update, starting with our most recent product updates followed by other specific sections that speak to different aspects of our product.

Helping your customers get the most value out of your product is key to keeping them satisfied with what you have to offer. Using a Channel to bring those important announcements and updates to the surface is a great way to ensure that your users know what’s going on, what they should pay attention to, and what they should try out if they haven’t already!

One of the best parts about Wistia Channels is that once you’ve embedded it on your website, you can always add additional videos to the Project, add or remove sections, and modify it to your heart’s content without ever having to touch the code again. Simple as pie!

And just like the delicious pie we’re now craving, we hope you’re hungry to start organizing your Wistia Channel today. It’s super simple to make your content more easy to digest for your viewers, so take the time to get it just right! All of your viewers will thank you for it in the long run.

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Video Marketing

Can I Turn off Ads on My YouTube Videos? What YouTube’s Right to Monetize Means for Businesses

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YouTube recently announced that it’s adding the Right to Monetize to its Terms of Service. What does that mean, exactly? Well, the update is just what it sounds like — YouTube can now show ads on all videos across all Channels, even if you’re not enrolled in the YouTube Partner Program. In other words, if you have videos on YouTube, there will be ads in front of them. Not only will they be able to profit off these ads, but notably, they’ll be retaining 100% of that profit.

“YouTube can now show ads on all videos across all Channels, even if you’re not enrolled in the YouTube Partner Program.”

Be sure to read the full release notes for all the details, but in the meantime, here are some quick answers to the questions we bet you’ve been mulling over these past few days. Here’s how YouTube’s update will affect videos hosted on the platform and what it means for your business.

To put it simply, it means that if you upload any video content to YouTube, Google — the platform’s parent company — can do with it as they see fit. Primarily, this means selling ads against it. What types of ads? And from what companies? This is left to YouTube’s discretion. So, your competitors (or really anyone willing to pay the price to access your audience) can run ads on your content.

“So, your competitors (or really anyone willing to pay the price to access your audience) can run ads on your content.”

Because users of the platform no longer have the ability to turn off ads on their content, those that use YouTube to embed videos on their site, for example, have no control over what the experience is like for viewers. A site visitor may navigate to your product page, click to watch your product overview video, and then get served an ad from your competitor instead.

Regardless of who advertises on your content, if you’re using YouTube embeds on your site, the experience is still less than ideal for the audience you worked so hard to drive there. Not only is the experience distracting, but the lack of control over who can advertise there means you can unknowingly create some pretty off-brand experiences on your site.

Ads can be displayed before, during, or after any content hosted on the platform. And with this update, YouTube can monetize any video, as long as it meets its ad-friendly guidelines. For those trying to build an audience on their YouTube Channel, this change to YouTube’s Terms of Service means you no longer own or control your content.

If your business is just getting started with building an audience on the platform, your videos will now be disrupted by ads that interrupt and often annoy your viewers. Showcasing ad-free content as you try to grow your audience can be a big plus for creators with small audiences — after all, what viewer doesn’t love free content that truly feels free? Without ads, you can spend more time focusing on making the content the best it can be, encouraging viewers to continue to watch more of your content.

Want to know the differences between using YouTube vs. Wistia to help build your audience? Head on over to this post where we break it all down!

YouTube is great for uploading clips, trailers, and other secondary content types where you can benefit from the platform’s reach without giving everything away. For businesses, in particular, uploading the valuable content you create to YouTube in full means seceding total control to the platform.

“For businesses, in particular, uploading the valuable content you create to YouTube in full means seceding total control to the platform.”

Let’s acknowledge the elephant in the room — YouTube is free. There are costs that come with running the business, and YouTube is continuing to look for ways to monetize their platform.

If you’re unfamiliar with the YouTube Partner Program, this was a way for YouTube creators to receive revenue shares from the platform based on ads shown on their content. Google would keep 45 percent of all YouTube advertising, with the remaining 55 percent going to the creators themselves. To qualify, creators needed to have more than 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of video content consumed on the platform in the last 12 months.

Why does this matter? According to a recent report from Pex, almost 90% of content uploaded to YouTube never surpasses 1,000 views (see chart below). Clearly, YouTube is looking for a way to monetize all of this low hanging fruit. Right now, the profit from all of that content is left on the table.

Now, let’s take a look at how 1,000 views — where 90% of content tends to hover on the platform — relates to the 4,000 hours of video consumption needed to qualify for the YouTube Partner Program.

Zach Snyder breaks this down in his medium article from a few years ago.

“We know that 4,000 hours of Watch Time is equal to 240,000 minutes. Technically you could put out 1 video every 2 weeks and end up with 24 videos by the end of the year. If you can get each of these videos up to 1,000 views apiece, then you’ll be able to make the required amount of Watch Time.”

How many businesses that upload content to the platform would be able to sustain this level of content creation? How many companies could guarantee 1,000 views on each video every two weeks? Chances are, for small to medium-sized businesses, you probably won’t qualify for the YouTube Partner Program, where you could at least get a piece of that ad revenue. Now, YouTube is ensuring they make money off your content, regardless.

These changes are currently being rolled out for US channels, while the terms of service will apply in all other territories from mid-2021. It’s important to remember that YouTube is a social media platform as much (if not more so) as it is a video hosting platform.

As YouTube continues to look for ways to monetize, we have to take a closer look at how those efforts impact the content hosted on that platform, and subsequently, the content that’s embedded on business’ websites. Use the platform strategically as part of a broader marketing strategy, and remember — the answer to the question, “Who should own my content?” should be you.

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Video Marketing

6 Actionable Tips for Improving Emails with Video

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Email is still one of the most effective ways for marketers to reach their audiences. Adding video into the mix can improve open and click-through rates and encourage deeper engagement with your content.

We teamed up with the team at Keap — a software company that offers a CRM and marketing automation platform geared toward small businesses — to offer you six tactics that you can start using to better engage your audience with video and email.

Video is the best tool for showing your customers who you really are. Don’t be afraid to loosen up and let your personality shine. This doesn’t mean that you have to be silly or strange. It simply means that you just have to be you.

If you’re an in-house video producer trying to get your coworkers to deliver authentic takes, check out some of these tried-and-true tips for directing non-actors. If you’re just starting out with using video for your business, remember that a well-thought-out script, a smile, and some quality lights can go a long way.

Create a clickable thumbnail

When it comes to using video in email, video thumbnails serve as the gateway or invitation to your video content. Let’s be honest – we all know that people judge books by their covers all the time. Similarly, people judge videos by their thumbnails.

Make sure to customize your video thumbnails to boost your click-through rates. Even something as simple as a friendly human waving is more enticing than a blurry office scene or overlaid text on a graph.

Here at Wistia, we’re passionate about helping our customers use video to better market their business. With our Thumbnail Editor, you can add text or use a looping video to take that brand touch to the next level!

Using custom GIFs to tease video content is also a brilliant strategy for enticing your recipients to click.

Creating a GIF from a video is not as complicated as it may sound. If you haven’t created GIFs from your videos before, you can use apps like GIF Brewery to get up and running quickly.

Once you create your GIF, you can add it to any email, link it to a blog post or landing page, and watch that click-through rate skyrocket. We’d hypothesize that a dynamic preview of what’s to come will perform better than a static image in an email, but you’ll have to run some tests with your own audience to find out.

If you’ve got content that could work well as a video series, try integrating it into an email campaign. Email courses and campaigns can benefit from this approach, especially if each piece of video content points to the next one. It’s like a suspenseful Netflix drama, except with marketing emails.

Because you can track who clicks on what video and how much of each video they watch, you can quickly assess which of your leads are most interested in your content. Plus, if you’re using a marketing automation platform, you can use video-centric campaigns like this to efficiently qualify leads.

With Wistia, we’ve made it super easy to showcase your video content in a sleek and binge-worthy way with our product feature called Channels. Instead of creating an email marketing campaign with several emails, you can upload all of your videos to a Wistia Channel, and link directly to your Channel in one email. Your videos will appear in a Netflix-style format when you embed a Channel to your website.

Additionally, you can collect subscribers from your Channel, easily sync your subscribers to your marketing automation platform or CRM for better lead tracking, and schedule email notifications when you publish new videos.

Explore how Wistia Channels can better showcase your content and get more people to spend time with your brand.

This sounds simple because it is. Once you’ve created an email that includes a video thumbnail, try testing out two subject lines – one that includes “[VIDEO]” and one that doesn’t.

A. How to direct non-actors [VIDEO]
B. How to direct non-actors

Track their respective performances, and learn whether or not your audience is more apt to open an email that includes a video. Sometimes it pays to be explicit.

Subtle uses of emojis in subject lines or body copy of your email can also help draw attention to your content. Just be aware that emoji render differently in different environments.

If video is already baked into your content strategy, you’re probably rolling out videos on a consistent basis. If this is the case, you should consider creating videos catered toward different segments. While this approach requires more time and energy to execute, producing a video with a specific segment in mind will make the content more relevant and personalized to your viewers.

Want to learn more about using video and email together? We have a complete guide that’ll show you why and how you should be using video and email together to accomplish your marketing goals.

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Video Marketing

Get Found: Improve The Discoverability of Your Show with Podcast SEO

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Congratulations on starting your podcasting journey. The hardest part, just getting started, is over! Now, it’s time to focus on the fun parts — making great audio content and engaging your audience.

One of the biggest challenges podcasters often face is growing their audience. And, while we are big fans of focusing on the quality — not quantity — of fans and followers, there’s no questioning the importance of finding your niche and connecting with them in meaningful ways.

“While we are big fans of focusing on the quality — not quantity — of fans and followers, there’s no questioning the importance of finding your niche and connecting with them in meaningful ways.”

Podcast discoverability and promotion is a rapidly evolving field. In this post, we’ll take a deep dive into the world of podcast search engine optimization (SEO) and explore how you can optimize your show and episodes for organic search performance to enhance discoverability. We’ll also share real examples from our very own podcast, Talking Too Loud. Let’s go!

For anyone unfamiliar with the term, “SEO” stands for “search engine optimization.” SEO is a well-known digital marketing tactic to improve content performance online without using advertising dollars to boost performance.

In the context of this article, we’ll discuss tactics to improve how your podcast or show performs specifically in search engines. Keep in mind, podcasts in general, are a relatively new marketing channel, so the concept of podcast SEO is also very new.

“Keep in mind, podcasts in general, are a relatively new marketing channel, so the concept of podcast SEO is also very new.”

Before you get started, it’s important to have a specific goal in mind. Are you trying to compete competitively in a non-branded space? Are you optimizing for general show or brand queries? What do the search engine result pages (SERPs) look like for your target? How competitive is the space you’re targeting? Does your target align with search intent?

For podcasts specifically, this last question — search intent — is critical. It’s unlikely that your show will appear for broad queries like “digital marketing tips.” However, a target like “top digital marketing podcasts” would be more in line with what someone is searching for — a podcast on a specific topic.

And that’s just for your show as a whole; you should follow this same thought process for episode-level research as well. For example, if you have an episode interviewing a well-known thought leader, include that name in your target. Of course, be mindful if this person has their own show that might muddy the waters.

It’s also important to keep expectations in-line with the reality that podcasts are relatively new! And many people aren’t yet relying heavily on search engines to find new shows; a word-of-mouth recommendation from a friend or plug from a show someone already listens to is far more likely to produce a net-new listener than a Google search.

Your primary goal for podcast SEO should first be to make sure your show and episodes appear for searches that include your brand or the word “podcast” — like “talking too loud podcast” or “talking too loud wistia.” From there, you can branch out and expand your targets to things that don’t necessarily include your brand, like “top podcasts for entrepreneurs” or “best business interview shows.”

With expectations and goals in mind, let’s dive into some more tactical tips on how to get started.

Keyword research

Depending on your podcast goals and the level of effort you’re willing to put forth, keyword research might be a worthwhile investment for your show. This research could also be used to help inform some of the more broad positioning and messaging about your show.

Here are a few things to look for when deciding on a target keyword or phrase:

  • What type of podcast are people searching for? This might include some research around podcast topics, like “content marketing podcasts” or “podcasts for entrepreneurs.” This could also be a useful gauge for how saturated a particular topic is or isn’t.
  • How are people searching for podcasts? What types of questions or phrases do people use when looking for new shows?
  • Why are people searching for this? What is your audience hoping to get out of finding a new podcast? To learn something new? To feel inspired? Uncovering the real intent and end goal of your audience will help you align your positioning and messaging.
  • What’s the search volume? How competitive is the keyword? The more search volume, the more competitive the SERP. Keep in mind — queries related to your targets will likely be very low, and that’s ok! Quality over quantity, remember? Folks searching for these low-volume keywords are very qualified for the content you’re producing.
  • Can your content compete? While your podcast shouldn’t have trouble competing in a branded space, this consideration is important if and when you want to get more aggressive and target broader queries. Do some research on these SERPs and what shows are presented. Is your podcast realistically a good fit for this space?

This sounds like a lot, we know. But it really boils down to understanding your podcast, understanding your audience, and bridging that gap. How would you approach finding this content on Google? What words or phrases would you use?

For a deeper analysis, try these handy keyword research tools:

  • SEMrush
  • Ahrefs
  • Moz
  • Google Keyword Planner
  • Google Trends

Your marketing team may or may not already use one or more of these tools. If you’re starting from scratch, check out Google’s array of free tools, like some of the ones mentioned above.

This step is essential on both a general show level and for individual episodes. Have you noticed the individual episode embeds directly within search results in some of the examples we’ve shown? Google now supports this functionality (with a few caveats), and you’ll definitely want to optimize your show and episodes to appear here. The good news is that Google has plenty of documentation to help you get started.

First and foremost, you need to get your hosted podcast on Google. Podcast hosts may or may not offer this functionality (good news — Wistia does!), so be sure to check whether or not your host will pass along your RSS feed appropriately.

By syncing your feed with Google, you’ll be able to present your podcast to a much larger audience. This integration feeds your show to Google search results, the Google Podcasts app, Google Home speaker system, and more (which is outside of the scope of what we’re discussing today but good to know in general).

How can you track if your episodes are being indexed? Well, Google just launched a new tool to help showrunners manage their podcasts in one convenient place. Meet, Google Podcast Manager. This new dashboard is your one-stop-shop to managing your podcast exposure and performance in Google.

At this level, we’re really looking to improve the performance of your show in general. Does your podcast website or Channel show up for branded queries? Are you listed in relevant carousels that might appear for more broad show terms that you’re targeting?

Podcast name and branding

Search engines are smart enough to sniff out keyword stuffing, like naming your show “Digital Marketing Tips Daily With Digital Marketing Expert Joe Schmoe.” And having an independent brand is a great overall strategy to being keyword-first. By adding in your keyword targets naturally throughout your show copy and branding, you’ll increase association with those targets and resonate more clearly with your target audience.

For example, For Talking Too Loud, we are targeting entrepreneurs and brand-builders. We reflect this in our show boilerplate copy with “On this podcast, Chris Savage, Wistia’s CEO and loudest talker, takes you inside the minds of entrepreneurs as they share the hilarious, informative, and most challenging aspects of building more human brands.”

We could have named the show something more keyword-forward, like “Brand-building and Entrepreneurship Tips with Chris Savage.” But, we wanted to tell more of a story with the name and really lean into the show’s core concept: What gets business leaders “talking too loud” inside and outside of work. We included Chris’s name in the show (it is his show, after all) to build on his authority and increase the show’s association with Wistia. And, Talking Too Loud is short, snappy, and easy to remember.

Have a dedicated podcast website or webpage

Having a dedicated podcast website or at least a portion of your website dedicated to the podcast is essential for having a strong search engine presence. Without this, podcast distribution sites, like Stitcher or Apple, will rank highly for your own branded show queries. This takes traffic away from your site and directly to third-parties.

And, having a podcast website or webpage gives listeners a stronger connection with your brand and introduces them to all of your other show content. This also enables you to capture engaged listeners’ info to serve them even more show news, like new episode alerts, exclusive behind-the-scenes content, and more.

You can see this with our show, Talking Too Loud. The Wistia Channel ranks first for the query, followed by third-party apps below.

At this level, we’re focused on improving the performance of individual show episodes. Is the episode indexed on Google? Does the episode show up for specific episode-related queries? Ideally, your keyword or target phrase should appear naturally in your show title, title tag, meta description, and organically throughout the show (and, therefore, the show transcript and/or show notes).

Transcripts/episode show notes

Say it louder for the people in the back: transcripts are essential for podcast SEO. As savvy as search engines have become, they aren’t yet smart enough to listen to and understand your podcast audio content. Therefore, they need something else to go by, and that something is written text. And, transcripts provide an accessible show experience for the humans that actually engage with your podcast.

There are plenty of affordable options (including Wistia!) that offer transcription services, and most major podcast hosts support transcript uploads. Transcripts should be a part of your ongoing podcast process, just like creating a show outline and editing your new episode.

But wait — what about show notes? What’s the difference between notes and a transcript? Should I have both, or one or the other? Well, like most things, this depends.

A transcript is a literal script of everything said during a podcast episode — the full rundown. Show notes, on the other hand, are often a stripped-down version of this. Show notes typically focus on the key takeaways from the episode and include helpful information like links to things referenced in the show, contact info for show guests, etc.

Our advice: If your podcast host offers both, use both! Bare minimum, have a complete transcript ready to go for each episode.

Blog/written content

Your website’s blog is another natural place to cross-promote your podcast. Blogs often carry more authority than a net new podcast page, so cross-linking is great for sharing that authority.

What content should you write to support your podcast? Are episode recaps a good idea? This is a tricky question as it really depends on your overall content strategy.

One thing we’ve struggled with is getting search engines to index our pages based on our priority. For example, the Wistia blog has hundreds and thousands of articles spanning the past 10+ years. That’s a lot of content! And that content carries a lot of weight.

We’ve done episode recaps for shows in the past where the blog post ends up outranking our show channel, which is where we really want to drive folks to watch and engage with our show content. Whoops!

For us, showcasing our Channels product and providing our audience with an exceptional listening/viewing experience is a top priority, so we always try to drive folks to the show Channel.

That’s why for Talking Too Loud, we are taking a different approach. Instead of writing and sharing episode recaps, we’re focusing on more theme-based and behind-the-scenes content. This content might not “perform” well if you just consider pure search volume, but the intent is fundamentally different. We want to showcase a different side of the show, connect listeners with our hosts and the team here at Wistia, and empower brands to embrace podcasting to build brand affinity — which is much different from a pure organic show awareness goal.

However, your goal might be different. If your goal is to attract as many listeners and gain as much exposure via natural search as possible, episode recaps might be a great fit. The key is to consider how you want your show presented and how you want people to listen or engage.

There you have it, our comprehensive guide to podcast SEO. Remember to ground your expectations and focus on driving value for show listeners. Your end goal should be to make it easy for folks to find and fall in love with your podcast.

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