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The 20 Best Chrome Extensions for Marketing

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Chrome is the most popular browser around the globe, with around 70% of Desktop market share worldwide. But, did you know it’s also an incredibly useful tool for marketers?

Extensions are beneficial for users because they allow you to create a browsing experience that’s tailored to your specific needs and the way you like to work. When you take more control over Chrome’s functionality, you create a more curated, personal workspace.

Now, there’s a huge library of plugins out there (most of them free) that can help improve the speed and efficacy of a multitude of marketing tasks, but where do you begin? How do you even know what you’re missing out on? In the spirit of sharing, we’ve compiled a list of 20 essential Chrome extensions every marketer should have.

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1) View Rendered Source

What it’s good for: Looking at the rendered source code of a page alongside its raw version

Description: With more of the web leveraging JavaScript rendering and single page applications (including our new Channels feature), the “source” of a website isn’t necessarily an accurate view of the HTML and CSS once a page has fully loaded. Expanding on the built-in “view source” functionality within Chrome, Rendered Source adds an option when you right-click on a page to view the fully rendered source alongside the raw source.

2) Redirect Path

What it’s good for: Checking HTTP Status codes and uncovering unnecessary or suboptimal redirects

Description: Redirect Path from Ayima includes an icon in the Chrome taskbar which indicates the status code of the page you’re on. Clicking on the icon will reveal the chain of redirects your browser went through to load the current page.

3) Soapbox

What it’s good for: Creating great-looking how-to or tutorial videos

Description: Soapbox is a free tool we created at Wistia, specifically to lower the barrier for creating great looking marketing videos. With Soapbox, you record your screen and your webcam simultaneously and then switch between full-screen and split-screen views in the editing process. The output is a new style of “presentation video” that is a step-up from a basic screencast or webcam recording — ideal for simple product demonstrations or explainer videos.

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4) Grammarly

What it’s good for: Preventing spelling and grammar errors when writing pages, documents, and emails

Description: When installed, Grammarly highlights spelling and grammar errors in any text input field, in a manner we’re all familiar with from Microsoft word. Clicking the highlighted error will show recommended changes, allowing you to quickly improve the quality and consistency of your writing.

5) Buzzstream Buzzmarker

What it’s good for: Conducting outreach and prospecting

Description: The Buzzstream Buzzmarker extension will crawl the website you’re on, and pull out contact details for appropriate individuals associated with the website. You can then add these contacts directly to your Buzzstream database, and send out an individual or bulk email from the outreach CRM.

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Image courtesy of Buzzstream.

6) TubeBuddy

What it’s good for: YouTube optimization

Description: TubeBuddy is an essential tool in the arsenal of any video marketer. It pops up detailed analytics next to any YouTube video, showing the tags, the view counts and how many best practices a specific video abides by. When you upload a video, TubeBuddy offers suggested tags and optimizations to the metadata to ensure you’re maximizing the potential reach of the video you’ve just updates.

7) Ghostery

What it’s good for: Seeing what trackers other sites are using

Description: While primarily billed as a tracker blocker and ad blocker, Ghostery also provides a helpful list of the trackers and cookies triggered by every page you visit. This information can be helpful for competitor analysis and discovering tech-stacks powering marketing funnels.

8) BuiltWith Technology Profiler

What it’s good for: Discovering tech stacks and historical redirects

Description: The BuiltWith Technology Profiler is a free extension that includes some of the features of the full Builtwith platform. Clicking the icon in the Chrome taskbar shows you a long list of all the technology a specific webpage is utilizing, and the “redirects” tab will show you all the root domains which redirect pages to the root domain you’re visiting.

9) MozBar

What it’s good for: Improving keyword optimization of any given page and evaluating the overall authority of a website

Description: The MozBar is a real swiss army knife of an extension, with many possible uses for the acquisition-minded marketer. It either functions as a drop-down, providing detailed meta and link data analysis on any website you visit or as a fixed icon in the taskbar, indicating the Domain Authority of the website in question. The two most prevalent features are probably “Page Analysis,” which allows you to get a snapshot of the title, description, schema.org mark-up, rel=“canonical” link attributes, and more for a specific page, as well as “Link metrics” which allow you to see Page Authority, Domain Authority, and the number of linking root domains to a given page. While the Mozbar is free, it really unlocks when combined with a Moz Pro Subscription ($99 per month).

10) SEOquake

What it’s good for: Assessing the competition for a given keyword in organic search and discovering the display & PPC ads other companies are running

Description: SEOquake has been a favorite since the less scrupulous days of SEO, and remains an extraordinarily handy toolset for all things search. A SERP popover allows you to see domain and page level metrics for ranking results, and clicking the link when browsing a website allows you to analyze the ads they’re running, as well as explore internal links and trigger more detailed page-level diagnoses. An integration with SEMrush allows you to bring in more data to SEOquake, so if you have an SEMrush subscription, the extension becomes even more powerful.

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Image courtesy of SEOquake.

11) Page Analytics (by Google)

What it’s good for: Seeing which internal links users click on for any page on your website

Description: The Page Analytics Chrome Extension from Google is a very handy tool to make Google Analytics data more actionable. When clicking the icon in the Chrome taskbar, a drop-down will appear, showing page-level visit data, alongside an overlay across the whole page which gives percentage figures on each of the internal links displayed, showing you where users typically travel to from any given page, thereby allowing you to better understand user journeys.

12) Web Developer

What it’s good for: Seeing how webpages function with JavaScript and CSS disabled

Description: The web developer Chrome Extension is incredibly useful for testing code changes and triaging bugs, but for marketers especially, it’s really useful for seeing how a webpage will appear to various bots and crawlers that don’t render JavaScript or CSS.

13) LinkedIn Sales Navigator

What it’s good for: Working out someone’s email address

Description: LinkedIn Sales Navigator (formally Rapportive), adds a sidebar to your Gmail account, showing details from the Linkedin profile associated with the email address you are writing to. You can, therefore, reverse engineer this, and use the tool to validate guesses for a specific email address.

14) Buffer

What it’s good for: Scheduling and syndicating social media posts

Description: Buffer adds icons onto Twitter posts, allowing you to schedule retweets or commented retweets, and add new posts into your social queue. You can also use the extension to quickly plan a social post that links to the URL you’re currently viewing, and share things across LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter simultaneously.

15) Bitly

What it’s good for: Shortening links for social media posts

Description: Clicking the Bitly icon in the Chrome taskbar quickly creates a custom short link (which you can alter) for the page you’re on. This speeds things up if you’re planning lots of social posts in quick succession

New-Bitly
Image courtsey of Bitly.

16) Google PageSpeed Insights API extension

What it’s good for: Getting a quick overview of how fast your pages are

Description: PageSpeed insights is a fairly crude look at site speed, but it can nevertheless be useful when looking to optimize loading speed and user experience. Clicking the icon in the Chrome taskbar loads the desktop and mobile PageSpeed insights scores for the page you’re on, as well as an overall score for mobile friendliness.

17) Tag Assistant (by Google)

What it’s good for: Checking to see all appropriate tags are firing on a specific page

Description: Tag assistant records which tags are being fired by Google tag manager, and then provides a list for you to observe or export. It’s a simple tool, but can be very helpful when debugging tracking issues on your website.

18) User-Agent Switcher

What it’s good for: Testing how your website functions for different devices, browsers, and bots

Description: User-Agent Switcher, very simply, allows you to override your default browser settings and look at the web from the perspective of other devices and browsers. You can also manually add user-agents to mimic various bots and crawlers.

19) Keywords Everywhere

What it’s good for: Finding new keywords for SEO & PPC

Description: Keywords Everywhere adds a box to any Google results page which shows similar keywords to the one searched for alongside keyword volume, the average cost per click and a competition score. The “Add keywords” feature then allows you to build out an expansive keyword list as you’re exploring different Google search queries.

20) Similar Web

What it’s good for: Estimating competitor’s traffic

Description: Clicking the SimilarWeb icon in the Chrome taskbar provides a dropdown which gives some insight into how a competing site is performing — including estimates of absolute traffic and a relative breakdown of traffic sources and audience locations. This can be helpful for benchmarking yourself against others, as well as assessing the reach of a potential co-marketing partner.


There you have it. We hope this list is useful when it comes to building up your own personal collection of Chrome Extensions. Are there any essential or obvious ones we missed? Let us know in the comments, and if we agree that they’re good as you say they are, we’ll add them to the post!



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Video Marketing

3 Key Characteristics of Successful Brand Videos

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Video isn’t a hot new trend anymore; it’s now a major part of marketing for all kinds of businesses. For many successful companies, video is a way of expressing what they care most about. In a way, brand videos don’t support the brand — they create it.

Building a brand with video doesn’t take a lucky break or a viral hit; as they say, the devil’s in the details. Each video you create is a puzzle piece making up a larger picture that contains clues about what your brand is about and the story you want to tell your audience. And while every business is unique, there are a few common traits that all successful brand videos share:

  • They contain visual elements that clue viewers in to what the video is about and why they should watch in the first place.
  • They possess a unique aesthetic that helps give viewers an idea of how they should feel about your content while also making your content instantly recognizable.
  • They are focused on a very specific audience which makes it easier to attract viewers that will hopefully dive deep on a topic.

Over time, these traits work together to form a cohesive, creative, and engaging expression of your brand. Now, let’s take a look at each one of these traits and how you can use them to your advantage in your own video content!

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When it comes to video, first impressions really matter — you’ve got to make a lasting one, and fast. Even if someone is already on your site, you want to give them a reason to click “play” on your video. Just like a catchy blog post title can attract link clicks on social media, a compelling video title can encourage plays.

Successful videos often have titles that are descriptive, funny, or thought-provoking. In tandem with that, an enticing thumbnail should work together with the title to catch viewers’ eyes with bright colors, an expressive face, or a combination of the two. All of these factors give the viewer an idea of what they can expect from your video before they hit play.

Will Barron, the creator of the Salesman Podcast, uses attention-grabbing, bold titles for his videos that often hint at exclusive knowledge or advice. He also maintains a consistent look and feel across all of his thumbnails and titles, which creates a more cohesive brand experience. Here are some examples of his titles:

  • How to Use Humour to Get Prospects’ Attention
  • The 4 Customer Personality Types
  • Why “Customer Success” Will Earn You More Money
  • Stop Faffing Around – Effective Social Selling Explained

Apart from the distinctly British “humour,” a lot of these titles follow common headline best practices that marketers and journalists have been using for ages. In particular, the use of numbers, “how to,” and direct challenges to the viewer pique curiosity and entice them to find out more.

What you can do:

  • Determine what your audience is searching for and tailor your title to specific keywords
  • Follow traditional best-headline practices when writing your title
  • Test out different title styles to find what resonates with your audience

Good design is a shortcut to emotion, and luckily, you can employ a number of traditional design techniques throughout your videos to make an emotional connection with viewers. For brand videos, design elements can be as simple as maintaining a consistent player color or typeface for the title card and credits. Other aesthetic factors could include the framing of the video, the set, lighting, background, and even the clothes people wear on camera.

It may sound like a lot to think about, but it’s worth it, we promise! Monet had impressionist landscapes, Van Gogh had portraits in pointillism, and you have the few signature touches you can apply across all of your brand videos. By using consistent visual cues, your audience will recognize your videos right away, no matter where they’re shown. These consistent design elements will tie your videos together and help you create a body of work with a distinct visual style that lasts decades.

“Monet had impressionist landscapes, Van Gogh had portraits in pointillism, and you have the few signature touches you can apply across all of your brand videos.”

One business that has been using design to their advantage is Drift, a conversational marketing platform. From their use of colors like royal blue and electric yellow, to the talking-head cutouts present in every thumbnail on their site, to the Drift logo in the frame (and on people’s T-shirts), you can’t miss a Drift video.

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Drift’s visual style is a bit “loud” but for a good reason. They want people to get excited about marketing, especially in the B2B world, and are using bright colors and unique visuals to attract attention. It doesn’t hurt that they’re able to maintain a similar high-energy aesthetic throughout their videos as well.

What you can do:

  • Use expressive colors that are consistent with your overall brand, and that evoke particular emotions, whether that’s happiness (yellow), anger (red), or trustworthiness (green). This color wheel of emotions can help get your wheels turning — though it’s not the final word!
  • Collaborate on a video style guide that includes fonts, visual treatments, and other guidelines with your design team and use it as a template for your brand videos moving forward.
  • Host regular meetings between writers, producers, and editors to keep everyone on the same page when it comes to scripting and creating videos.

As you build your brand, you’ll realize there are a few things you want to be known for, as well as key themes you’ll want to cover in the content you create. Just think about your blog — what topics do you write about there? What are some subjects you could explore even deeper? Chances are, there are quite a few areas related to your industry that you or some of your teammates are already incredibly well-versed on, and that’s a great place to start.

Businesses that are creating successful brand videos use their expertise in conjunction with enticing visuals and a consistent style to attract niche audiences that are interested in consuming a number of videos on a specific topic. Find a topic you can get really nerdy about (or better yet, talk about for hours on end) and use that content to attract your target audience.

“Find a topic you can get really nerdy about (or better yet, talk about for hours on end) and use that content to attract your target audience.”

InVision, a digital product design platform, does this particularly well with their “Design Systems” series. With a handful of videos, this ambitious prototyping software company is able to establish themselves as an authority on all things design systems.

This series moves InVision out of the realm of “product people” and into the realm of “design thought leaders.” Because of this series, they have a unique space to bring people together and discuss the important issues and ideas impacting the design community today.

What you can do:

  • Come up with a list of topics you want to explore and see how those overlap with your customers’ interests
  • Release videos on a regular basis (such as every Tuesday at 2pm) so your audience knows when to expect them
  • Reach out to other experts in the field to conduct interviews and build a strong network within your niche

Incorporating all of these traits into your brand videos is easy once you have a long-term strategy in place. After all, the best content (and this is true of blogging and social media, too!) is created when you have a goal and mind a specific story to share. Setting your intentions early on will make it easier to execute more and more ambitious brand videos over time, too.

If you start with a unique visual style and a niche you know well, you can grow your brand quickly and learn fast from what you put out into the world. You’ll start to see what works best and can actively add those winning traits into future videos you create, making your brand recognizable by your customers and beyond. Once you have more videos under your belt, you’ll be able to dig more deeply into specific themes and take even bigger creative risks.



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Video Marketing

Can Video Drive More Search Traffic to Your Site?

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This is a question we hear a lot from customers and prospects alike here at Wistia. The short answer? Yes, having videos on your website absolutely can drive more traffic from search.

However, the impact will differ for every business, depending on your size and niche. In this post, we cover how you can discover the impact video is having on your SEO, the ways in which videos can drive more search traffic, and what we’ve learned from running tests on our own website.

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The new Google Search Console is the best source of truth for data on how much traffic videos are bringing to your website from search. This tool helps you measure your site’s search performance, fix crawling issues, and upload sitemaps.

Once you’ve got it set up with your site, click into the Performance menu, and then segment the search type by Web, Image, and Video.

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This view allows you to see how much traffic you’re getting from video search and which queries are driving the most traffic to your videos, and then compare performance over time.

You can also see which pages are bringing in video search traffic, and compare those numbers over different periods of time as well.

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This report is great if you want to get a quick look at which videos are acquiring the most traffic, and the relative difference between impressions and clicks will give you a good indication of whether your title and video thumbnail are appealing to searchers. However, it doesn’t tell the full story of the positive impact video is having on your search performance.

Having a video on the page not only helps you get traffic from video-specific search, but it can also increase your relevancy for certain queries, and therefore increase rankings and visibility in universal search, too.

“Having a video on the page not only helps you get traffic from video-specific search, but it can also increase your relevancy for certain queries, and therefore increase rankings and visibility in universal search, too.”

For example, consider the video results for the query: “How do you record your screen”

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Here we see the top ranking result in video search is from Digitaltrends.com.

If we look at the universal search results under the “All” tab, we see that the same page is ranking 2nd, after an answer box and a “people also ask” box, but this time, as a straight webpage result, rather than a link with a video snippet.

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It’s a reasonable assumption here that for queries like this, having a video indexed on this page positively impacts the organic rankings for the universal query, even though the video snippet is not displayed — as the surrounding results are all from stronger domains.

Last year, we migrated our blog content over to new a platform and CMS. During this process, we accidentally launched with a bug that prevented Google from crawling our embedded video content, meaning that most of our videos dropped out of the index — let’s call it an “unplanned experiment.”

This was a significant mistake for a company so reliant on using video in our marketing, for sure, but luckily, we were able to move quickly to rectify the error. This fix then gave us an indication of how much traffic our videos were directly accounting for, by comparing the weeks directly before and after the videos were reindexed.

Video Search Traffic

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Overall Search Traffic

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Having our videos indexed accounted for 1,387 direct clicks from video search, but an overall increase of 6,100 clicks from all search.

So, for our website in September of last year, having our videos indexed increased organic search traffic by 10.6%. Obviously, your mileage may vary. Wistia.com is mid-sized SaaS website with a lot of videos and a lot of queries which relate explicitly to video.

“So, for our website in September of last year, having our videos indexed increased organic search traffic by 10.6%.”

Nevertheless, it’s highly likely that you’ll also see a positive impact on traffic by including indexable video content throughout your website. And, thankfully, the new Google Search Console gives you the means by which to test this for yourself.

While video can clearly help drive more traffic to your website — this begs the question, are all videos created equal? Do Wistia videos drive more traffic to than YouTube videos?

The answer? Usually, yes. This is because embedded Wistia videos are indexed for pages on your website, whereas embedded YouTube videos are indexed for youtube.com. But (as with everything in search), this is not a universal truth, and some sites will see different results.

The best thing to do is test it for yourself, and luckily there’s a simple way to do that:

  1. Sign up for a free Wistia Account
  2. Swap out a few YouTube embeds for Wistia Embeds
  3. Patiently wait a few weeks for the traffic to accrue
  4. Use the Video Search Report under “Performance” in Google Search Console to compare the pages in question before and after changing the embeds
  5. Check traffic to the same pages via the Web Search Report, too.
  6. Determine the percentage change in traffic for video and universal search
  7. If there is a marked difference, this is a clear indicator that moving your website videos to Wistia will result in an increase in organic traffic.
If you’re interested in learning more about the differences between Wistia Channels, our newest feature, and YouTube Channels, check out this post!

We’ve worked hard to ensure that our embed codes automatically optimize the videos on your site for search engines, as they’re designed exclusively to serve companies using video on their websites. YouTube, on the other hand, is a social media platform designed to serve content creators looking to monetize their videos or promote large-scale advertising campaigns.

Video can be a really valuable tool for driving more traffic to your website, and often small changes to your embeds, such as including structured data, can make a big difference.

Understanding the true impact of video SEO for your business will require some testing, but thankfully the new Google Search Console makes this process fairly straight forward.

Have you seen success with video in your business thus far? Has using video in blog posts or on landing pages improved your organic search performance? Share your questions, successes, and more with us in the comments!



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Video Marketing

Where to Share Your Brand’s Video Content (Besides YouTube)

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The number of social video platforms that exist seems to keep growing every year. And hey — we’re not mad about it! As marketers, we’re always looking for new ways to share our content and get our business discovered. However, that doesn’t make it easy for us to choose where to distribute the videos we’ve invested so much time and energy in creating.

In this past, YouTube was the holding ground for all things video, including long-form, short-form, informative, entertaining … the list goes on. But as our very own Phil Nottingham put it in his WistiaFest talk from 2017, these days, all social networks are video platforms. With so many options available to us, it’s hard to know what platform(s) make the most sense for our unique businesses. After all, if you’re doing it right, you aren’t just sharing the same video across all of your networks. That means investing even more time into creating unique versions of your content catered to every platform.

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In this post, we’ll look at the social video landscape as it stands today and how factors like your audience, your message, and what you measure can help inform your decisions for distributing your brand’s video content!

While YouTube is still super popular, other legacy social networks are now investing heavily in video. Plus, new video networks are popping up all the time, which means everyone can find the perfect place to share their content online.

In late 2017, both LinkedIn and Reddit launched native video, and based on its success, Reddit launched in-stream video ads a year later. In 2018, mobile video app TikTok became the most valuable startup in the world. Twitch also had a breakout year in 2018, with its gaming livestreams seeing a 21% increase in viewership (that same year, YouTube game streams were down 12%). In 2019, Twitter released a new camera feature, encouraging filming from within the app.

Video production has also gotten much easier in recent years. Whether you’re an individual or a small business, technical whiz or software newbie, anyone can make a video. This process has been brought about through increasingly high-quality smartphone cameras, fast internet connections, and products like Soapbox and free video editing software.

So, how do you decide where to distribute your brand’s video content? It all boils down to a few simple questions based on categories any video marketer should be familiar with:

  • Audience: Who are you making these videos for specifically? Where does your audience like to spend their time?
  • Brand: What do you want people to know about you through your videos? What stories are you trying to tell?
  • Engagement: What do you want people to do with your videos? How will you measure success?

The answers to these questions will make choosing the best platform for your content much easier! Let’s dig in.

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There are two types of people on every video platform: Users, who are your potential audience, and creators, who are your peers and competition. Finding your place amongst both will give your content the best chance at success.

Some platforms have existing communities for the people you’re seeking to reach. Start with some demographic info to find out if your audience hangs out on a particular platform. Below is a super-quick, general summary of audience stats for popular and emerging platforms:

  • Twitch: 55% millennial (Gen-Y), 81% male, gamers
  • Reddit: 64% between 18–29, 67% male, frequent internet users
  • Facebook Live: All ages (over 2 billion people)
  • Instagram Stories: All ages, 68% female, 80% outside U.S.
  • Snapchat: Gen-Z
  • Twitter: Gen-Y and up, urban, highly educated
  • LinkedIn: Business decision-makers, 56% male
  • Houseparty: Over 50% under-24 (Gen-Z) ^
  • TikTok: Gen-Z

^ According to Digiday, the Houseparty team has so far been silent on advertising. However, the fine print of its privacy agreement asks users to consent to adverts when they sign up, suggesting brands are coming.

And these are just a few examples! No wonder it’s so hard to choose. Once you’ve settled on the best demographic fit, you can then look into audience interests and habits. Consider how and why similar audiences are using different platforms. For instance, Snapchat is largely used for private messaging, whereas TikTok videos are optimized for public viewing.

“Once you’ve settled on the best demographic fit, you can then look into audience interests and habits. Consider how and why similar audiences are using different platforms.”

Then, consider the other people on the platform — your fellow content creators. Are other brands gaining any traction? Are they creating content that interests you and your audience? A platform that encourages creator growth, as well as audience growth, will provide fertile ground for coming up with fresh ideas.

If you’re looking for more ownership over how you distribute your brand’s content, check out Wistia’s latest feature, Channels. No ads, no competition, just a collection of your videos — displayed in one easy-to-watch format!

What story are you trying to tell?

A brand that uses Twitch to stream online events will make a different first impression than one that mainly distributes content through Twitter. Every story you tell gets filtered through the lens of the platform. But still, you need a message that resonates.

Here are a few examples of how storytelling can work together:

Livestreams: Shows you’re transparent, that you want to create a global community, that you enjoy spontaneous interactions.

  • Use Facebook Live to: Stream events and interviews
  • Use Twitch to: Stream your screen and yourself
  • Use Twitter Live to: Stream newsworthy happenings

Series: Shows you’re an expert on a topic, that you want to share knowledge, that you are willing to go deep to explore a question or subject, that you want your content to last for a while (at least in internet-terms).

  • Use YouTube to: Promote trailers, behind-the-scenes clips, and monetize an existing YouTube audience
  • Use Wistia Channels to: Group and display your content on your own site, without ads, with more control and access to data

Daily Stories: Shows you want to check in with your audience every day, that you’re not afraid of off-the-cuff production, that you know how to create striking visual content.

  • Use Instagram Stories to: Capture spontaneous happenings, offer quick tips, show behind-the-scenes action, repost user-generated content, and collaborate with influencers
  • Use Snapchat to: Offer exclusive content to your most dedicated fans and partner with younger influencers

Video helps you tell your brand story in a visual, human way. The right platform helps you deliver that story in an appealing, engaging package that resonates with how your audience prefers to consume content.

“The right platform helps you deliver that story in an appealing, engaging package that resonates with how your audience prefers to consume content.”

Like any marketing initiative, trying out new video platforms should be tied to some measurable goals. Think about what you’re hoping to get out of your brand’s videos and what success looks like. A video can be deemed “successful” on social media and on your Wistia Channel — but that success will probably look a little different for each.

For instance, with social networks, you’ll probably want to measure engagement on your content within the platform using their analytics. Things like impressions, view counts, follower and subscriber counts, likes/upvotes/reactions, comments, retweets, and shares are all meaningful within those platforms and will contribute to your brand’s growth in those environments.

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On your website or Wistia Channel, you’ll want to measure your video’s performance differently. Organic traffic, time spent with your brand, and leads generated are all foolproof metrics to tie your content’s success.

For both social platforms and your own site, Time Watched is a winning metric for video. We’re big fans of Time Watched because it shows not just what’s the most eye-catching, enticing thing to click on, or what content persuades people to buy a particular product — instead it shows what people linger over and what makes them meaningfully engage. This gives you more information about what your customers truly care about and how you can connect with them more deeply and sustainably over time.

With all of these new video platforms emerging, you have tons of opportunities to interact with and win over prospective customers. And when you share your content on new, niche platforms, you can create highly specific content that’s more targeted. You can also express your brand more clearly without the constraints of traditional distribution platforms, helping you learn more about what’s working and what’s not. This way, both the medium and message go hand-in-hand — without sacrificing your brand.



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