Connect with us

Video Marketing

Got a Boring Business? Here’s How to Find the Right Stories to Tell

Published

on


You may believe your company doesn’t have a story worth sharing with the world–as a SaaS company ourselves, we’re no stranger to the “boring” business stigma that exists out there. When you aren’t selling a physical product, it can be a struggle to actually show what makes your product and brand so special.

Luckily, your product isn’t the only story your company can tell with video. In this post, we’ll help you uncover great stories you might’ve been sitting on all along. From detailing the structure of your company to showcasing office traditions no matter how small (or silly), learn how telling better stories with video can help build your brand and make you stand out amongst the competition.

storytelling

To many, the concept of storytelling sounds overly whimsical; images of children’s books filled with mystical creatures seem to come to mind in an instant. However, we use storytelling to communicate with people every day — it’s how we naturally understand each other as humans. But when it comes to sharing information, we often forget that we’re trying to reach and resonate with humans, too.

We mistakenly fill our messaging with unnecessary jargon and complex language that only goes in one ear and out the other. And when it comes to video, delivery is key. By harnessing the power of story for video marketing, companies can begin to engage their audiences and build their brand in more memorable ways. After all, according to Wyzowl’s 2018 State of Video Marketing Survey, watching a brand’s video has convinced 81% of people to buy a product or service. So, investing time in understanding storytelling may be worth it in the long run!

What are some storytelling basics, you ask? Well, Patrick Moreau, Founder of Muse Storytelling, dropped by the blog a few years ago to teach us about the four pillars of a strong story: People, Places, Purpose, and Plot.

  • People help establish connections with your audience
  • Places add authenticity and make your story believable
  • Purpose gives your story meaning
  • Plot impacts whether or not your viewer watches through to the end

As a marketer, your job is to build on each one of these pillars to craft a stronger story. In turn, your video can help boost engagement and bolster your brand.

This structure may not be the perfect formula for every piece of content, but it’s a good basis to go off of to start telling better stories.

Whether you’re creating short or long-form content, storytelling can help you effectively reach your video’s objective. Now that you have the basics under your belt, we’ll help you find the right stories to tell with these building blocks in mind!

“Whether you’re creating short or long-form content, storytelling can help you effectively reach your video’s objective.”

If you’re stuck in a rut thinking your company is bland and boring, we assure you it’s all in your head. Every business has its own unique stories to tell, and your audience deserves to hear them! Don’t have a clue where to begin? Get those gears spinning and think about how your company is structured, the way you run your business, and how customers feel about you.

How your company is structured

When you’re wrapped up in your run of the mill day, you may never stop to wonder what your audience would think of your company’s structure. However, this is a story opportunity you’re missing out on. People appreciate businesses who are transparent with their customers, and a behind-the-scenes glimpse can establish a more personal connection.

Put your product aside for a moment, and bring the wonderful individuals on your team to the forefront (yes, we’re talking to you, SaaS friends). Remember the People pillar? Members of your team are like characters in your story who help create depth. For example, Wistia’s co-founders Chris Savage and Brendan Schwartz decided to be super transparent about the state of the business and what they planned on doing with it. In order to build a lasting, creatively-driven, independent company, they took on $17M in debt to buy out their investors. After hearing their story, tons of people reached out to share their appreciation for Chris and Brendan’s relatability and financial transparency. In order to keep the conversation going, Chris and Brendan held a live Q&A. Check it out!

Another example of a story worth telling about your not-so-flashy business is simply how it was formed in the first place. Moz’s former co-founder, Rand Fishkin, published a book called Lost and Founder before announcing the debut of his newest venture, Sparktoro. What makes Sparktoro’s founding story so unique, is that Rand and his co-founder, Casey Henry, decided to adopt a corporate structure for their business as opposed to the traditional VC model. This structure holds the founders of the company even more accountable. According to Outseta, “Neither Casey nor Rand can take any profit or raise their salaries above the market average for Seattle until they have returned all invested capital to their investors.”

Why would someone care about this story? Well, without putting it in so many words, this founding story says, “If you do business with us, you can expect that we’ll be as transparent and honest as possible.”

Not every business has a story like Wistia’s or Sparktoro’s, but it just goes to show your audience can resonate and connect with your brand on many different levels. If your product can’t communicate who you are or what you believe in, let real people on your team and the story behind the business itself do the talking instead.

“If your product can’t communicate who you are or what you believe in, let real people on your team and the story behind the business itself do the talking instead.”

How you run your business

Another story your company should be sharing is the unique value your team creates. Like our previous point, shining a light on the people behind your product reminds audiences that robots aren’t running your business. Don’t be afraid to showcase the small things that make your organization so special.

Does your company take pride in its culture internally? Think about your company’s involvement in philanthropy or even how you treat your employees — these stories shouldn’t be kept under wraps!

Take Salesforce, for example. The cloud computing company created their own 1–1–1 Philanthropic Model, which engages employees and their communities to pledge 1% of product resources, 1% of employee time, and 1% of profits to charitable causes. Since the company’s founding, they’ve given more than $240 million in grants, 3.5 million hours of community service, and provided product donations for more than 39,000 nonprofits and educational institutions. And they’re not the only tech brand making the world a better place. Check out this article from Yonah that highlights 11 other tech companies with a serious philanthropic side.

1F5A3873-X3

To shine a small spotlight on our work culture, we’ve given our audience a taste of the way we like to run our Sales team here at Wistia. We strive to create an environment that’s focused on the sharing of ideas and best practices amongst teammates — not purely cut-throat competition. We’ve asked members of our Sales and Success teams to share their greatest tips for Sales in short clips on LinkedIn, spreading the wealth of knowledge even further with our audience. Not only do they provide valuable sales advice and expertise, but our viewers also get to see some of the friendly faces of the folks who work here.

The way you create value and run your business is only a story you and your team can tell. Sharing even the smallest idiosyncrasies of your organization can help build a stronger connection between your audience and your brand. It’s time to show the world what makes your company one-of-a-kind.

How your customers feel about you

Whatever industry you’re in, sometimes the most powerful stories about your company come from your customers’ perspectives instead of your own. And there’s no better way to showcase how your customers feel about your product or service than with video testimonials or case studies. The key to producing effective and compelling videos of this kind is to build up the People and Plot pillars of each story.

As storytelling expert Kindra Hall explains, “When telling client stories, organizations often lead with their solution: how the client uses their product and what it does for them. But they leave out the entire beginning of the story, the problem that the client had in the first place.” By focusing on the customer’s full story, you can build a stronger Plot and define characters who display more personality, desire, and motives.

Additionally, developing characters out of your clients sounds production-heavy, but it’s actually rather simple. Patrick Moreau put it best when he said the easiest thing you can do to develop characters is to include a bit more detail about who they are and what they want. Their desire will pave the way for empathy among your audience.

One company who does this really well is Toast, a cloud-based restaurant software company based in Boston, Massachusetts. Here’s an example of one of their customer case studies:

Before Toast, Paris Creperie’s system wasn’t customizable, and it hindered the restaurant’s fast-paced environment and dedication to providing a unique customer experience. After watching the video above, it’s clear that using Toast’s cloud-based POS interface has helped the restaurant in more ways than one. From busting lines with online ordering to increasing tips three times over, Paris Creperie’s supervisor was thrilled to share how Toast has positioned the restaurant for more revenue, happier employees, and even a better overall customer experience.

These types of stories can also be particularly effective for products or services that have a health or wellbeing impact. Take WebPT, a B2B SaaS company that makes software for physical therapists, for example. WebPT’s software enables physical therapists to do their jobs better, allowing them to “serve those who serve us,” like firefighters or policemen.

In WebPT’s case study for T.O.P.S. Physical Therapy, Dr. Amy Brannon and her team lead their story with the heartfelt idea around the special environment they’ve created for their patients. As Brannon describes, “Everybody just smiles right when they walk in … People come here and they want to be here.” Employees care about spending time with patients to help them experience growth. And with WebPT, the software streamlines workflows and brings in more patients to provide more care for more people, which is what matters most to the T.O.P.S. team.

WebPT has seen such success with using video to showcase their product, that they’re encouraging their own customers to do the same — giving their audience simple tips they can follow to use video in their physical therapy practices. If they can find success with video in their niche, so can you!

Don’t miss out on all the stories your clients can tell about how your product or service helped them solve their problem and make their business better. You never know who might resonate with their story and want to know more about your business.

Believing you have a “boring” business is no longer a valid excuse for being unable to find interesting stories to tell. Even tech companies without physical products have found ways to relate with their audience and build stronger connections to their brand. When you keep the building blocks of a story in mind, you can showcase how your company is structured, the way you run your business, or how customers feel about you in a more compelling way. Don’t be afraid to open up to your audience and start standing out among the competition!



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Video Marketing

The First 3 Videos Your Small Business Should Make

Published

on


How can a small business with a small budget get started with video marketing? The answer is actually pretty simple: start with the videos that will have the biggest impact on your business. With that framework in mind, let’s take a look at the first three videos your business should start making today!

If you’re a small business, you might not be able to tout the big brand names that make people say to themselves, “Wow, impressive company X uses them? They must be good!” But lucky for us, the rise of online video in recent years has made establishing trust much easier for businesses of all sizes. And of course, the demand for video isn’t going anywhere. According to research from the folks at HubSpot, 54% of consumers want to see more video from marketers in the future. So if you haven’t started investing in video, now’s the time!

How can a small business with a small budget get started with video marketing? The answer is actually pretty simple: start with the videos that will have the biggest impact on your business. With that framework in mind, let’s take a look at the first three videos your business should start making today!

If you don’t make any other video this year (though we’re confident you’ve got what it takes), start with a product explainer video. Think about the last time you surfed around a company’s website and thought to yourself, “Is this business even legit? What the heck do they do?” This is the last impression you want to leave on a site visitor or potential customer, which is why a product explainer video is the first video you should make.

Remember that the content of your video is far more important than how shiny or professional it looks. You don’t need to break the bank to make an effective product explainer video — in fact, before you invest in a big production, try making a video that’s a little more on the DIY side and see how it works for your business. You can always upgrade your video later or even test other versions against it to see which one resonates most with your audience.

“Remember that the content of your video is far more important than how shiny or professional it looks”

Take a look at this product explainer video from Basecamp, a project management and team communication software. Small budget? No problem.

This video doesn’t simply showcase all the best features Basecamp has to offer. Instead, it paints a picture (or in this case, draws one) that clearly points to a problem the software can solve (if you’re a busy project manager, use this tool to make your job easier).

It’s easy to focus on your product’s features, but what you really want to do is hone in on the problem your business solves. Appeal to viewers’ emotions and explain how your solution can help make their lives easier, better, more fulfilling — whatever the case may be — and you’re on your way to seeing success with video.

Types of explainer videos you can make

Now that you’ve hopefully seen the value of product explainer videos, let’s dive into a few different types of videos your small business can start investing in. Depending on what resources are currently available to you, not to mention how much time you want to put in to the final product, there are a number of avenues you can take.

Animated video
Arguably one of the most popular types of explainer videos a business can make, animated videos are easy to outsource thanks to services like Yum Yum Videos, Powtoon, or even freelancers on Fiverr who can turn your script into an imaginative video.

Live-action video
If you plan on shooting the video yourself (whether you have an in-house video producer or not), consider the following tips for making your video as effective as it can be:

  • Start with a great script. As odd as it might seem, the written word is the foundation for any great explainer video.
  • Keep it short and sweet — 60 seconds or less is perfect.
  • Use simple, conversational language. No business jargon allowed!
  • Incorporate some shots of what you’re actually selling in your video — show and tell.

Screencast
Is your small business in the SaaS space? A simple screencast video works particularly well in this context; plus, it also happens to be super budget-friendly. Check out this example from the team at Slack, a business communication platform.

See how easy it is to understand how their product works? That’s exactly what you’re looking for.

If you want to simplify the screencast process as much as possible, we just happen to offer a nifty screen recording tool that lets you make high-quality product explainer videos in a snap. Try Soapbox for free today!

Install Soapbox Today!

Some businesses tend to shy away from collecting testimonials, and who can blame them? The task can feel scary and intimidating, and ROI is difficult to predict at the outset. But what’s so great about testimonial videos is that you only need one or two solid ones in your catalogue to see the difference they can make.

Start by interviewing some of your long-term customers that have seen tangible results thanks to your product, and share those videos on a prominent page on your site. Again, building trust can be a tricky part of marketing a small business. But with an effective testimonial video, you can go above and beyond that goal.

“Start by interviewing some of your long-term customers that have seen tangible results thanks to your product, and share those videos on a prominent page on your site.”

When it comes time to brainstorm who you might reach out to for these interviews, think about who your ideal customer is. Make sure the customers you feature in your testimonials are aligned with your target audience. Ideally, your prospects will be able to see themselves and their businesses in the testimonial videos you create.

Ultimately, video testimonials help visitors feel more confident in your business and the services you provide. And why wouldn’t they? Your most authentic subjects are your actual customers.

One company who does this really well is Mailchimp, a marketing automation platform and email marketing service company. Here’s an example of one of their customer success stories:

After watching this video, the viewer has a better understanding of how a boutique called Azalea San Francisco uses Mailchimp’s landing pages to drive their sales, promote events, and stay relevant.

Tips for making video testimonials

Ready to produce your very own video testimonials? Here are some of our favorite tips for making a compelling testimonial that builds trust and looks great:

  • Before the interview, give your customer an idea of what topics you’ll cover, but don’t share all of your questions just yet! You want their responses to sound as natural and unrehearsed as possible.
  • Shoot the video at the customer’s own workplace if possible, as it helps drive home the authenticity factor.
  • Capture additional B-roll footage throughout the shoot, whether you think you’ll need the shots or not. These small moments can round out your video and make it more cohesive.
  • Let the camera run, and edit the takes later. Ask your interviewee to repeat what they’ve said if they fumble over their words, but for the most part, try to keep your footage natural.
  • Keep it conversational so your subject feels comfortable. This can often lead to more emotional, authentic responses.

If your small business has a particularly interesting background, company story videos are the way to go. How did your business get started? What was your motivation for starting the company? By featuring the friendly faces of your teammates, you can make your prospects feel right at home. After all, people are buying more products and services based on emotion rather than logic, which is one reason why appealing to a visitor’s psyche is so important.

A company story video lets you show off what makes your business so special and unique on a human level like no other medium can. When people are able to associate familiar faces and names with a business, they’re more likely to feel a strong connection to it — and ultimately have a positive experience with your brand.

“A company story video lets you show off what makes your business so special and unique on a human level like no other medium can.”

In this video, find out the history behind Redbarn Pet Products, a healthy, wholesome dog food company.

I don’t even have a dog and I’d give Redbarn my money! But in all seriousness, this two-minute video gives you a solid understanding of what matters most to Redbarn as a business. You learn how this family-owned dog food company got its start, what it believes in, and how it views running a business. An all-around success!

Types of company stories

What if your story isn’t as cute and wholesome as Redbarn’s? Not to worry, because there are some other types of videos you can make to achieve a similar goal. Your company’s culture and how team members feel about working there today are just as important as the story behind how you got your start. Here are a few ways to underline that:

  • Crowdsource a simple video featuring current employees. Empower your peers to tell their own stories by submitting video clips that can be compiled into one video.
  • Interview some of your own employees. Think “customer testimonials” but from your employees. Ask them some questions about their day-to-day life at your company and record their responses.
  • Use B-roll footage from a company event or party and record a voiceover after the fact. This is a super low-budget way to make a video that emphasizes what your company culture is all about, with virtually no pre-production effort involved.

Marketers know that testing new channels and tactics before going all-in on one is the best way to make informed decisions. And when you work at a small business where resources can run thin, you want to make sure you’re spending your time wisely. That’s why, as a video software company built by marketers, we recommend getting started with these three types of videos.

Easily build trust, establish credibility, and show the people who work at your company, and you’ll be on your way to building an even more reputable and buzzworthy business.

Continue Reading

Video Marketing

4 Businesses That Grew Through the Power of Creativity

Published

on


When most businesses decide to scale, they usually channel all of their thoughts and energy on meeting the end result: growing their company by X percent. But, ironically, focusing on the results doesn’t always mean you’ll get them.

In a live interview at Goldman Sachs’ Technology and Internet Conference in 2015, Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO, was asked to name some of Apple’s most significant accomplishments from the past year. Famously, he responded, “We’re not focused on the numbers. We’re focused on the things that produce the numbers.”

In essence, Cook was saying that focusing on the process rather than the results is the key to success. After all, to thrive in a world brimming with infinite options, you need to create a product or service worth purchasing — and not just purchasable.

Building something that can cut through the noise requires extraordinary creativity. To inspire your company’s creative process, we explore four companies that have leaned heavily on creativity to fuel their growth. Read on to get your own creative juices flowing.

When Nick Gray was asked to go on a date to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, he was a little disappointed. The Met was where you went when your parents were in town, not when you were going on a romantic date. But Nick liked the woman he was seeing. So, he accepted her invitation.

To his surprise, Nick and his date didn’t aimlessly meander through every exhibit that caught their eye. Instead, Nick’s date gave him a captivating tour of different art, sculptures, and artifacts. Enamored by the Met’s vast collection of humanity’s history, Nick realized just how special the museum actually was.

Nick became obsessed with the Met, visiting it all the time, voraciously researching exhibits that piqued his interest, and eventually giving his own tours to friends. His tours got so popular that he realized he could turn them into his own business. He called it Museum Hack.

Museum Hack’s mission is to shatter the common belief that museums are boring — just as the date at the Met had done for Nick. Leading themed tours, such as the one based on Game of Thrones, through some of the country’s top museums, Museum Hack takes customers on focused, energetic journeys that are chock-full of stories, games, and, most importantly, fun.

“Museum Hack’s mission is to shatter the common belief that museums are boring …”

Museum Hack knows that their guides can make or break tours, so the company hires expert storytellers who train for three months before leading a single tour. They also dig up the juiciest stories about historical figures, art, and artifacts that you’d never see on a museum plaque, ensuring that they entertain just as much as they educate.

Convincing the public that museums are the most remarkable institutions on earth is a tall order. But Museum Hack has done just that — and then some. Their tours have garnered over 5,400 five-star reviews on TripAdvisor, generated $2.8 million in revenue in 2018, and grown their business by 107% in the past three years.

One of the least appealing parts of marketing? Sourcing stock photos. Not only are most stock images cheesy, but they can also be costly. Fortunately, Mikael Cho, the former CEO of Crew, an online marketplace for creatives, harbored this same disdain for cheesy, expensive stock photos.

Back in 2013, Crew had only three months of cash left. No venture capitalists were biting either, so Cho tried to attract some attention by building a Tumblr website that offered free, professional-grade photos. His target market could probably use them.

Four hours and $19 later, Unsplash was born. And after posting Unsplash on Hacker News, Cho’s side project rocketed to the top of the discussion board and attracted 50,000 visitors in one day. Within a month, Unsplash had 20,000 email subscribers and even referred some customers over to Crew.

Four months later, Unsplash helped Crew double their revenue, which enabled them to secure $10.6 million in funding. Unsplash had officially saved Crew.

Soon after, tech media outlets, like The Verge, Next Web, Fast Company, TechCrunch, and Forbes, ate the story up. Forbes even started using Unsplash’s photos and linked back to their website. Two years later, Unsplash became Crew’s top referral source.

The story of Unsplash is compelling proof that focusing on creativity can pluck you out of even the deepest financial abyss. By focusing on the artistic side of photography — not necessarily the business side — and the customer experience, Unsplash attracted a steady stream of users and publicity. This focus persuaded the best freelance photographers to publish photos on their website to market their art and, in turn, continually enhance Unsplash’s library of images.

“By focusing on the artistic side of photography — not necessarily the business side — and the customer experience, Unsplash attracted a steady stream of users and publicity.”

Since then, Crew spun off Unsplash as its own stand-alone company. The Tumblr website that initially offered ten free photos every ten days now boasts a network of 110,000 contributing photographers and a library of 1 million images that have been downloaded over 1 billion times.

What’s arguably even more impressive is that Cho sold Crew to Dribbble in 2017 and raised $7.25 million in funding for Unsplash. Not only did Unsplash save and spark Crew’s growth, but they also built themselves into something any entrepreneur would be proud of.

In 2008, Jack Conte and his wife, Nataly Dawn, started a band called Pomplamoose. But, unlike most new bands, they didn’t want to build their presence through live gigs; they wanted to build it online.

For the next five years, Pomplamoose created and posted original songs, experimental covers, and clever mash-ups on YouTube, attracting over 150,000 subscribers. Some of their videos even went viral and boasted millions of views. But the exhilarating high Conte felt watching the band’s loyal fan base grow would always crash when he checked their YouTube revenue each month. At most, they would make a few hundred dollars.

Fed up with the internet’s self-centered monetization model and the lack of respect and financial security artists received, Conte teamed up with entrepreneur Sam Yan to launch Patreon, a platform for artists to offer monthly subscriptions to their content and generate a reliable stream of income.

From podcasters to musicians to comedians, artists of all stripes can effectively monetize their creativity on Patreon, taking home an average of 90% of their subscription revenue. Conte and Yan specifically designed their business model this way because they wanted Patreon’s success to depend on their artists’ success. In other words, creativity is the only thing that can fuel their growth. And it’s working.

Today, Patreon has over 100,000 artists creating content on their platform and over 3 million patrons supporting them. Patreon is also expected to process $500 million in payments and generates $50 million in revenue in 2019 and has raised over $165 million in venture capital.

During the first half of the decade, most podcasts were cliché, talking-head interviews with little personality or flair. Most people listened to them to educate themselves on a specific topic — not necessarily to entertain themselves. But that all changed once Sarah Koenig’s iconic podcast, Serial), launched in 2014.

Serial was one of the first narrative-driven podcasts ever released, and it captured the imagination of the entire world, reaching 5 million downloads faster than any other podcast in history.

After binge-listening to Serial and witnessing everybody squabble over Adnan Syed’s innocence, Steve Pratt, the co-founder of Pacific Content, realized he could help businesses make the same mark in the working world.

Serial raised people’s podcasts expectations, but many brands didn’t have the expertise or resources to craft shows of that caliber. This market gap inspired Pratt to launch Pacific Content, a production agency that makes original podcasts with brands. He became an early adopter of narrative-driven podcasts and partnered with some of the world’s biggest brands, including Facebook, Slack, and T-Brand Studio, to craft shows that rival top podcasts like This American Life and even the agency’s own inspiration — Serial.

Blazing the trail for brands to tell stories through podcasts and winning numerous awards for their work, Pacific Content was acquired by Rogers Media, one of the largest and most influential Canadian media companies, in 2019.

To thrive in a world of infinite choice, building a product or service that can cut through the noise is crucial — but trying to manufacture the results won’t get you anywhere. Instead, focus on the process and channel your creativity, just like these four companies did.

Continue Reading

Video Marketing

2020 Video Trends & Usage: Consumption is up 120% During COVID-19

Published

on


The COVID-19 pandemic has completely shifted the way the world works — including how businesses function and how employees do their jobs. Here at Wistia, we immediately noticed an uptick in content creation and video engagement this March when the pandemic began to sweep the nation.

Now, several months into this “new normal,” we’re ready to pull back the curtain and share some data and trends from our platform in true Wistia fashion. After all, we do have a track record of being super transparent with our business decisions, successes, and even the occasional flop.

Below, we’ve outlined the top three trends related to video engagement that we’ve seen during the pandemic and tips for how to use this information to implement a more strategic video plan this year. All data referenced is compared to Wistia data pulled from the prior year, 2019. Let’s dive in!

Video consumption is more ubiquitous than ever — and our data clearly supports this trend.

Before March of 2020, Wistia saw an 18% increase in hours watched per week from 2019 to 2020. Hours watched represents the average number of hours of video content consumed per week across all of our customers.

We started 2019 with an average of 2.2M hours watched per week. This increased to an average of 2.6M hours at the beginning of 2020.

Since early March of 2020, we’ve seen a year over year increase of 120%. The average weekly hours watched increased drastically from 2.6M to 4.6M — peaking at 5.7M during the week of April 27th.

This increase means that people are watching more video content on our platform than ever before.

Additionally, before March of 2020, Wistia saw a 31% increase in weekly video plays from 2019 to 2020. This represents the number of times a video was played in a given week.

The number of average weekly video plays was 1.6M at the beginning of 2019, which increased to 2.1M at the beginning of 2020.

Since early March, that number has increased by 65% compared to the same time last year. This means that viewers are actively engaging with video content at a much higher rate than they were before the pandemic.

This increase in engagement has created a huge opportunity for SMBs to connect with consumers through well-marketed content. How can you engage your audience with video? From video voicemails for personalized sales outreach to teaser videos on social media — the options are only limited to your imagination. If you’re looking for where to get started, check out these 15 business video examples for inspiration.

Many organizations and industries have pivoted to relying heavily on video for communication and other essential business functions, which has leveled the playing field for SMBs.

Quarantine and work-from-home mandates have forced marketers and non-marketers alike to become creators and embrace constraints to produce great work — and many have realized that you don’t need a professional set up to produce high-quality video and audio content. Just look at Saturday Night Live — a highly planned and produced comedy show that pivoted to creating the entire weekly show from home.

Businesses have embraced these challenges with video content from home, conveying a level of authenticity that’s been quite welcomed. This trend of making video more accessible has led to an increase in the total volume of video uploaded to Wistia.

Before March of 2020, Wistia saw a 42% increase in weekly video uploads from 2019 to 2020. This number averaged 121K at the beginning of 2019 and increased to 172K at the beginning of 2020.

Since early March, the year over year increase has jumped to 120%. We’re now seeing an average of 280K videos uploaded to Wistia each week.

If you’ve been considering dipping your toes into the video waters, there’s no time like the present. Check out our free Beginner’s Guide to Video Production series to get started.

Small business leaders are some of the savviest and most resourceful leaders out there. When an opportunity comes knocking, they answer the door.

Before March of 2020, Wistia saw a 17% increase in weekly account creations from 2019 to 2020. This number averaged 2.9K at the beginning of 2019 and increased to 3.4K at the beginning of 2020.

Since early March, the year over year increase has jumped to 85%. We’re now seeing an average of 5K Wistia accounts created each week.

When signing up for Wistia’s services, a majority of small business leaders have noted they have more of a need to store and share videos since the pandemic began. These types of customers tend to be starting their video marketing program from scratch, recognizing that every business moving forward will have some aspect of digital engagement.

For example, SMBs can now host well-produced virtual events that are much more affordable and easy to execute compared to a live, in-person event. From small-scale webinars to large-scale conferences, we’ve seen the full spectrum of virtual events.

In addition to events, many companies are getting creative with how they reach their audiences. We’ve seen an uptick in sales teams using video as an outreach and communications tool versus in-person meetings. We’ve also seen creators of all kinds — school teachers, exercise instructors, entertainers, and more adopt a video-first strategy.

Creativity doesn’t stop just because marketers are working from home. As we create a new future, brands are in a position to reach their audiences in new and authentic ways.

Our data confirms that marketers are working harder than ever to create content that is appealing to their consumers–meeting them where they are through well-executed video content.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 Plolu.