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9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

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John Lincoln


If you want your website to load quickly on a mobile platform, you should make use of Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) technology.

Fortunately, that’s easy to do if you’re using WordPress because there are quite a few AMP plugins available.

Even better: many of them are free.

You will, however, need to invest some time to configure them properly. You might even need to make some design tweaks.

Still, it’s worth the effort if Google rewards your site with a top rank in mobile search.

Quick note, before you try any of these AMP plugins for WordPress, make sure you:

  • Create a backup version of your website.
  • Ensure it works in your hosting environment.
  • Make sure it matches your goals for the site.
  • Have a developer on hand to make sure it can be configured properly.
  • Make sure it works with your theme.

Here are some of the best AMP plugins for WordPress in the market.

1. The Official AMP Plugin for WordPress

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

If you’re unsure which plugin to choose from in this list, you almost certainly can’t go wrong with the one that’s designed by the official AMP project.

Here are some of its capabilities:

  • Support for core themes: The plugin is compatible with the “core” themes (such as Twenty Twenty).
  • Compatibility tool: Sometimes, it’s not possible to automate AMP markup insertion. When that happens, the plugin will show which components are causing problems so you can address them manually.
  • CSS tree-shaking: The tool will remove unused cascading style sheets (CSS) so you can stay under the AMP-mandated 50k limit.
  • AMP Stories: While still in beta as of this writing, the plugin enables you to create, edit, and publish AMP Stories.

You can also configure the tool to follow one of three template modes:

  • Standard: Use the AMP plugin for your entire site. There’s no need to separate AMP and non-AMP content.
  • Reader: Shows pages with a simplified design that meets AMP standards. Each page has a canonical URL as well as an AMP URL.
  • Transitional: Delivers AMP and non-AMP experiences with the same look and feel.

The plugin also receives frequent updates. If you’re someone who’s into always getting “the latest and greatest,” that’s another argument in its favor.

2. AMP for WP – Accelerated Mobile Pages

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

One of the more highly rated options in this list is the AMP for WP plugin.

Yes, it even has a better average rating than the one produced by the official AMP project.

AMP for WP also offers a rich feature set that includes:

  • AdSense support.
  • Contact Form 7 support.
  • Email opt-in support.
  • Call To Action support.

In other words, if you want to transform your website into something resembling a mobile app and use it for digital marketing, this plugin might be your best bet.

The tool also plays nicely with some of the more popular WordPress SEO plugins, including Yoast SEO, All in One SEO, SEOPress, Rank Math, and The SEO Framework.

Additionally, AMP for WP also integrates with WooCommerce. If you’re selling products online, that feature alone can give you a nice competitive advantage.

The developers of the plugin offer premium support if you’d need a hand getting things up and running.

3. Schema & Structured Data for WP & AMP

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

How would you like to add markup to your pages so that they appear as rich snippets in search results?

If so, then have a look at the Schema & Structured Data for WP & AMP plugin.

Please note: this option isn’t an AMP plugin per se. However, it supports AMP. That’s the important takeaway here.

The tool also supports 33 different schema types, including blog posts, news articles, local business details, recipes, products, and videos.

If the schema type you want to use isn’t supported, the developers say that you can request it and they’ll add it for you.

The tool even supports conditional display fields, so you get to decide which posts, pages, or other content gets marked up.

You can even import markup data from other schema plugins, including SEO Pressor and WP SEO Schema.

The premium version of the tool enables you to add reviews and offers priority support.

4. PWA for WP & AMP

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

If you’d like to transform your website into a progressive web app (PWA), take a look at the PWA for WP & AMP plugin.

Use the tool to take your user experience up a notch with the latest and greatest web tech bells and whistles.

For starters, and most importantly for this article, the plugin offers full AMP support.

It also comes with UTM tracking, multi-site support, and a cache expiration option.

PWA for WP & AMP also offers a service worker feature that optimizes your website. That translates to faster load times for visitors.

And maybe best of all: the tool includes offline support. Visitors can load the site in a jiffy even when they aren’t connected to WiFi.

The premium version of PWA for WP & AMP gives you access to a loading icon library, calls to action, and data analytics.

5. Glue for Yoast SEO & AMP

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

If you have the Yoast SEO plugin and the Official AMP Plugin for WordPress then you’re going to need the Glue for Yoast SEO & AMP plugin as well.

Why? Because it’s the “glue” that enables the two plugins to work together.

It also gives you an easy way to customize your AMP content.

Additionally, Glue adds rudimental styling so you can retain at least a little bit of the site’s look and feel for AMP visitors.

It’s developed by the same developer who created the Yoast SEO plugin.

6. AMP WP – Google AMP for WordPress

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

This one appears to be a fairly new entry in the library of AMP plugins. As of now, it’s only got a thousand active installations.

Still, the AMP WP plugin demonstrates promise. According to the product description, you can get as much as a 5x faster load with the tool.

Also, the developer claims that it’s 100% compatible with Yoast SEO.

Here are a few other features you get with the plugin:

  • GDPR support (for Europe).
  • Slider support.
  • Related posts view.
  • Support for third-party analytics (like Google Analytics).
  • Ability configure AMP for specific taxonomies (tags and categories).
  • Optional sticky header.
  • Image lightboxes.

7. weeblrAMP CE

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

The weeblrAMP plugin goes beyond what other plugins offer by empowering you to create a nearly complete AMP version of your entire site.

Additionally, weeblrAMP integrates with numerous other tools, including:

  • Disqus
  • Google Analytics
  • Google Tag Manager
  • Facebook pixel
  • Yoast SEO
  • Jetpack
  • WooCommerce
  • Contact Form 7
  • Gravity Forms

Also, the plugin also enables you to fully customize the AMP experience with template overrides.

As of now, weeblrAMP only has 700 active installs. However, it’s got a 4.5-star rating.

8. AMP It Up!

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

AMP It Up! bills itself as another “set it and forget it” plugin. All you have to do is install and activate it and you’ve magically got an AMP-compliant website.

Truth be told, though, nothing is that simple. Especially in web development.

You’re going to have to do some manual configuration.

The tool offers support for:

  • GDPR
  • HTTPS
  • Google Analytics
  • YouTube
  • BrightCove

You can even add your own custom JavaScript to your AMP-enabled website. That gives you some flexibility with the functionality.

Additionally, AMP It Up! automatically adds social share buttons to your pages. You won’t have to fish around for another plugin for that purpose.

Also, the tool will automatically convert content with several pictures into an AMP-compliant carousel.

AMP It Up! only has a few hundred installs at this point but it’s got a 4-star rating.

9. AMP Stories for WordPress

9 Best AMP WordPress Plugins for Speed, Search & Tracking

Want a way to create fast-loading full-screen content on the web?

You can use AMP Stories to get website visitors more engaged with your brand.

And yes, they’re just like Instagram Stories.

You can include images, animations, videos, audio, and text in your own AMP Stories.

If you like the idea of using AMP Stories, you should take a look at the AMP Stories for WordPress plugin. It enables you to create a Story by just filling out a form on a post.

The tool also enables you to include a URL on your Story. That can come in handy if you want to redirect people to another part of your site (for example, to place an order).

The pro version of AMP Stories for WordPress includes bookend management, support for extra content at the end of Stories, and Facebook integration.

The tool currently enjoys a 5-star rating.

Wrapping It Up

In this mobile era, you need a website that loads quickly on mobile devices.

Fortunately, that’s easy to do with AMP.

What isn’t so easy is to manually implement AMP technology on your website.

However, if you’re using WordPress, there are plenty of plugins that will do it for you.

If you haven’t already added AMP support to your WordPress site, why not grab one of the plugins listed here and get the ball rolling today?

More Resources:


Image Credits

All screenshots taken by author, December 2019



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How to Optimize AMP Stories for Google Search Results

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Matt Southern


An official set of recommendations concerning SEO for AMP stories is now available from the AMP Open Source Project.

AMP stories are similar to stories on social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram. The key difference is they can be indexed and displayed in Google Search results.

See: AMP Stories Now Have a Dedicated Section in Google Search Results

AMP stories are just like other web pages in the sense that they have a URL on your web server, they are linkable, and they can link out to other web pages.

Flavio Palandri Antonelli, a Software Engineer at Google, states:

“In particular, just like other pages on your site, make sure your Stories are linked from within your website so that your users and bots can actually discover them. If you are using a sitemap, make sure to include your Stories in that sitemap. If you are posting your regular web pages to social media, post your Stories as well. We could go on here, but the gist really comes down to: Follow the best practices you’re already applying to the rest of your website.”

See: Official AMP Plugin for WordPress Now Supports AMP Stories

AMP stories should be optimized like any other page on your website. What works for regular web pages will also work for AMP stories

With that said, there are some SEO tactics specific to AMP stories that can be utilized as well.

Specific SEO Tactics for AMP Stories

Here are the SEO tactics specific to AMP stories. Keep in mind these tactics aren’t comprehensive and should be utilized in conjunction with the standard SEO work being done for your web pages.

  • Metadata: AMP stories have a built-in mechanism to attach metadata to a story. This ensures maximum compatibility with search engines and other discovery features that take advantage of metadata.
  • Internal linking: Site owners should generously link to AMP stories from other pages, such as linking to them from the homepage or category pages where applicable.
  • URL format: There is no need to indicate in the URL of a story that it is using the AMP stories format. Follow the same URL format as other web pages on your site.
  • Page attachments: Page attachments can be used to present additional information in classic article form alongside your story.
  • Image descriptions: Use meaningful alt text where appropriate.
  • Video subtitles: Consider providing subtitles and/or captions for the videos in your Stories.

Source: blog.amp.dev



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How Hackers May Be Hurting Your SEO

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Natalie Hoben


It is oftentimes rather easy to sometimes grow complacent as an SEO when it comes to site security, or put all of the responsibility on I.T. departments when it comes to any form of cybersecurity or hacking prevention practices.

It’s a debatable topic amongst many, however, this is defiantly true:

Website security, or the absence of it, can directly and critically impact a site, and that includes the site’s organic performance.

For this reason, website security should not be ignored when it comes to digital marketing plans.

But first, let’s gain a deeper understanding of what hacking, it itself, is, in order to connect the dots on why it should not be neglected.

What Is Hacking?

Hacking occurs when an individual gains access to a specific website or computer network, sans permission.

Unwarranted hacking most often occurs when people are trying to gain access to sensitive or private information, or to redirect users to a specific hacker’s website.

What Are Some Common Tools Utilized by Hackers?

Malware

Malware is specifically designed to damage or disable a specific network, with the goal usually being a data breach.

The potential after-effects of a malware attack can be great, including extensive financial losses for an organization.

Spamming

Website spamming usually occurs when a hacker adds hypertext to a webpage that, when clicked on by a user, will link to the hacker’s chosen destination.

Adding spammy links to a hacker’s website on websites that have a high amount of traffic to them has a chance of increasing search engine rankings.

It is essentially a way to shortcut the system of solidified, ethical SEO work.

Effects of Hacking

The ramifications of hacking can be significant and far-reaching. There are a few more common things that can happen when a website is hacked.

SEO Spam

GoDadddy conducted a study a few years ago where they concluded that over 73% of hacked websites were hacked due to SEO spam reasons.

Something like this could be planned and deliberate, or an attempt to scrape a website that is authoritative and capitalize on strong rankings and visibility.

In most cases, legitimate sites are ultimately turned into link farms and visitors are tricked with phishing or malware links.

Hackers may also employ that use of SQL injections, where a site will be turned over with spam and recovery may be very difficult.

Malicious Code

This can potentially put your website in the sandbox if Google detects it.

If detected, Google will display a warning message when users try to navigate to the site, and therefore encouraging them to stay away.

It can also potentially result in the complete removal of a site from search engines in an effort to safeguard users.

This will both, directly and indirectly, influence SEO value:

  • Visits: Overall organic site traffic will most likely drop significantly.
  • Engagement metrics: Metrics such as time on site, pages per session, and bounce rate will most likely be negatively affected, which will send negative signals to Google in terms of user experience factors.
  • Mistrust: Users who know that your site may be less enticed to visit again if they know that your site has had one or multiple security issues, thus also affecting your traffic, and ultimately, your bottom line.

Unplanned Redirects

Oftentimes, hackers will implement redirects when a website is hacked.

These will send users to a different website than the one that they navigated to initially.

When users are directed to this separate web address, they will usually find that the site contains:

  • Malicious forms of content such as duplicate content that isn’t true.
  • Other types of scams like phishing where users are enticed to click on a spammy link and ultimately reveal sensitive information.

If Google follows your site that has been redirected and sees that it contains questionable content, it may severely hurt overall organic visibility in search.

Backlinks

Search engines carefully assess the overall reputation and value of domains and links that link to one another.

During a hack, links will oftentimes be added to a site, and most likely ones with low value, which can negatively affect SEO efforts.

Your website may ultimately be flooded with backlinks from questionable sources, which will most likely decrease the level of trust Google or other search engines has in a site.

Blacklisting

Being hacked can put a site at a serious detriment in Google’s eyes. This can affect a site’s presence in SERPs and also result in potentially several manual actions in Search Console if Google flags it.

The kicker is, is that oftentimes they do not. This usually only leads to more attacks, such as via malware, without the webmaster knowing, and puts the site at risk for an even greater loss, both from a visibility and revenue standpoint.

This creates a bit of a conundrum. Being flagged or blacklisted for malware essentially depletes your site’s visibility across the board, at least until the site is analyzed and cleaned and penalties removed.

Yet, not getting flagged when your site contains malware can result in greater risk and penalization.

Common Risks & How to Prevent Attacks

There are a few more common things that put your site at a greater risk of getting hacked:

Installing Plugins or Other Tools From Untrusted Sources or Not Updating Them

Many plugins, such as those used in a CMS such as WordPress, are not all secure.

Hackers are consistently searching for sites that use insecure or outdated plugins and then finding ways to exploit the site.

As a best practice, it is recommended to research a plugin and read reviews before installing it on your site.

Sharing a Server May Also Pose a Risk in Terms of Site Security

This is because someone could easily upload a spammy or malicious file, or even grant access to other hackers.

Non-Secure Credentials May Also Pose a Risk for Data Security

It is recommended that secure passwords are created for online accounts and make them difficult to guess.

Another more advanced method to prevent an attack is through penetration testing. This analyzes and tests your network’s security and any potential vulnerabilities within it.

Conclusion

Everyone is affected by web security. When building a partnership with a website or client, SEOs should be able to provide some advice when it terms to overall security.

If you’re responsible for the SEO effectiveness of a site, part of your role is to ensure that there are security measures in place to protect it.

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A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO

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A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO


3. Technical Aspects of Mobile SEO

Now let’s look at the technical aspects of mobile SEO.

When you optimize the SEO elements on a page, you should start with title tags, H1 headings, content, image alt text, URLs, and meta descriptions, just as you would doing standard SEO on your desktop site.

Pay special attention to your title tags and meta descriptions.

Mobile search results pages don’t display as much information as desktop SERPs, so your titles and descriptions will be truncated to a much shorter length.

Use those marketing skills to write shorter, more compelling titles and descriptions, so you’ll make a better impression when you show up in mobile searches.

It’s critical that you don’t block CSS or JavaScript. Older devices didn’t support CSS or JavaScript, so it was common practice to block them – less code ensured faster load speeds.

Now, Google’s spiders want to crawl your site as humans see it. And if CSS and JavaScript are blocked, Google can’t see what your page actually looks like, so you might experience visibility problems.

Make sure you don’t have any popups on your mobile site – they’re incredibly annoying.

Think about what you do when you’re browsing the web. When you get to a site and a giant popup appears, you get frustrated and close it immediately.

Your customers do the same thing.

A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO

Make sure you’re using schema markup. You should be using schema anyway, but it’s even more important when you consider the size of mobile screens.

And if you manage to get a rich snippet in search results, you’re even more likely to stand out when people are searching for you.

And finally, never, ever use Flash on your website! If you want your site to have animations or special effects, use HTML5 instead.

4. User Experience

It’s more convenient to search on a mobile device, but because of that convenience factor, user experience is critical to success.

So let’s talk about the things you should optimize to make your user experience stellar.

One of the most important UX issues on mobile sites is click size.

Whether it’s a menu button or a clickable element, you need to make sure the clickable area is large enough for finger taps.

Along the same line, pay attention to the distance between clicks. If your clickable areas are too close together, users will get frustrated when they can’t click what they’re trying to click.

Frustrated users are bad for business – they’re probably going to bounce.

Make sure your phone number is easy to see and is coded with a click to call link. Far too often, we see sites with unclickable phone numbers.

Why do you have your number on your site?

Because you want customers to call you!

So make things easy for them – add the click to call link.

A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO

Make sure your mobile menu is easy to navigate. If you’ve crammed a bunch of buttons into your menu, they’ll stack vertically on mobile, and might not fit on the screen – users will have to scroll to see them all.

If it’s too hard for users to find what they’re looking for, they’re going to bounce and find the answer or the product elsewhere.

Another massive mobile UX headache is forms. Most business owners and marketers don’t put much thought into their mobile forms, thinking that the responsive site solves everything.

The forms need to fit well on the screen, and they need to be easy to use. If the fields are too small, it’s tough to click them to select them.

But the biggest issue of all is the keyboard you use for your forms. There are several mobile keyboards available, and it’s important to connect the right keyboard to each field.

If a user needs to type in their name, you’re cool with the standard keyboard. When the user needs to type in a phone number, set that field to pull up the number keypad instead of the standard keyboard.

It’s a simple code change that will drastically influence the number of form completions you’ll see on mobile.

Font size is also important. Pull up your site on your phone – is it easy to read? Is there enough space between lines?

Don’t try to use a smaller font to squeeze in more content on the smaller screen – in fact, you most likely need to do the opposite. Make it easy to read and your users will be happy.

Make sure you’re serving different image sizes on mobile.

A full-screen image on a desktop is much larger than a full-screen image on a mobile device, so use your website code to serve up different images based on screen size.

Don’t load in huge images that you don’t need to. If you’ve got a slideshow, serve mobile-specific images for it, making sure they fit on the screen of a mobile device.

5. Mobile Site Speed

Page load speed is a Google ranking factor – and since it’s using a mobile-first algorithm, we know that mobile load speed is what matters.

It’s important, but note that your page load speed is really only going to affect your rankings if you’re in the bottom range.

The extremely slow sites get penalized – but once you’ve got a site that’s loading within a few seconds, shaving another half second off your load time isn’t going to help you rank any better.

It will help you convert more customers, though.

When you’re browsing sites on your phone, there’s nothing worse than going to a site that loads so slowly you feel like you’re going to die.

If that’s the case, your users will bounce and go to your competitors instead.

Most business owners and marketers have heard of Google’s Page Speed Insights tool. It shares incredibly valuable insights into how you can speed up your site, but it doesn’t really tell you how long your site takes to load.

Use it for the suggestions it provides, but opt for another speed testing tool to tell you the actual load time.

Now, we’re going to share eight tips that will help your site to truly rock in terms of page load speed.

A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO

  • Find quality hosting. Server response time has a massive effect on your page load speed, so get your site on a host that’s optimized for fast performance. We’ve seen WordPress sites get moved to a better host and the load time is nearly cut in half immediately.
  • Be careful with your site plugins. It only takes a few, especially chat and social media, plugins to slow down your site drastically. If you have any, try disengaging them and testing your “naked” site speed.
  • Prioritize the loading of above-the-fold content. In other words, load what the users see first. Make sure you’re not render-blocking anything above the fold.
  • Optimize your images before you load them. A 3-megabyte PNG file could be converted to a 210-kilobyte jpg image that looks the same on your users’ screens. Imagine how much faster your site will be if you could do that for every image. It’s also important to use responsive code to serve the right image size for the screen being used to view your content.
  • Be careful with redirects. Too many redirects can slow down your site – and so will redirect chains. Only use them if they’re absolutely necessary.
  • Optimize your site code. Make sure your HTML, CSS, and Javascript are clean and without any bloat. Minify the code to compress the files and reduce file size.
  • Use site caching. If you’re unfamiliar with caching, you set the browser to basically remember the site in its final configuration. That way, it can simply display the page without having to load the HTML, apply the CSS, load the images, and then fire off the JavaScript.
  • Use a CDN. CDN stands for Content Delivery Network, and it’s a collection of geographically different locations that serve your content. When a page is requested, its assets are served by the CDN server that’s closest to the user’s location.

6. AMP & Apps

We can’t talk about mobile page speed without mentioning AMP and PWAs, which are two alternative options for providing faster-loading content for your users.

AMP stands for Accelerated Mobile Pages, which are created with a special coding language that is based on a stripped-down version of HTML and CSS and loads almost instantly.

AMP tends to be mainly for news sites and wouldn’t make much sense for many businesses, as those pages don’t look as appealing as fully designed pages. Even worse, the AMP pages are stored on Google servers, and you get limited analytics data.

If you’re looking for a fast, streamlined user experience, apps are another option. Native apps allow you to do things that aren’t possible on a website.

There’s a bit of a barrier to entry, though – there’s no point in having an app if your customers and potential customers don’t download it.

You’ve also got to get the app approved by the App Store or Google Play.

A progressive web app, or PWA, gives you the best of both worlds. A PWA is a hybrid between a mobile website and an app.

You can download it directly from your browser without going to the App Store (or worrying about App Store approval).

It looks like an app on the user’s phone, but functions basically like a mobile website. PWAs are incredibly fast.

Thanks to data caching, once the PWA has been used one time, users can load and use the app without even being on a network. It can even send push notifications and access other functions on the device – just like native apps.

There’s even a newer hybrid combo of PWAs and AMP, commonly called PWAMP, which are progressive web apps built on AMP pages.

So, should you use one or the other, or any of the options at all?

Each business is different, so there’s no right or wrong answer.

It also depends on your customers and audience, on how users find you, and on how they engage with you once you’ve been found.

7. Optimizing for Local

Let’s finish up with talking about how to optimize your site for local.

Mobile searches are inherently local. Google knows you’re searching from a mobile device, and if that search has anything to do with local businesses, it’s going to show localized results.

A Definitive Guide to Mobile SEO

A Google study showed that 76% of users who searched for something nearby visited a related business within 24 hours of searching.

Even better, 28% of those visits resulted in a sale. If you haven’t heard of it before, Local SEO is going to be your new best friend.

You need to be sure your content is localized – it needs to reference the local area, and you should be including your city name in your content.

Don’t stuff the city name in, mention it conversationally. It’s also helpful to write locally focused blog posts – they allow you to talk about specific information about the local area.

You also need to be sure that your NAP information is displayed on every page of your site. NAP stands for name, address, and phone number. Make sure your phone number is click to call.

Your NAP information needs to be marked up with Local Business schema – a type of code that shows Google that you’re a local business.

You should also use local optimization tactics when you’re optimizing the important SEO elements on your pages.

Include your location keyword phrase in your title tag, in your H1, and in your image alt text. Don’t just add it to the end – try to make it conversational.

Most website platforms allow you to customize your URLs, so include your location keywords in your URLs wherever possible.

Finally, include your location keyword in your meta description. It won’t help you with ranking, but since it appears under your blue link when you show up as a search result, it’s helpful to include the location info to boost the likelihood of a clickthrough.

You’ll also want to shift your link building strategy and start targeting links from local businesses. Google’s local algorithm values links from local businesses, even if the authority metrics are lower than what you’re used to seeing.

You’ll need to be sure your Google My Business profile is claimed and fully optimized. It’s a direct interface with Google that allows you to supply specific details about your business, and it’s the first thing customers will see when searching for your business.

Reviews play a big part in the local algorithm as well, so if you haven’t been paying attention to reputation management, it’s time to start working on getting more reviews.

Citations are also important to the local algorithm. Citations are mentions of your NAP information on other websites. Basically, they’re your directory listings.

They’re a foundational Local SEO signal, and Google expects to see the same NAP listed every time it sees your information on another site.

Want to learn more about mobile SEO? Take this course at SEMrush Academy. You’ll learn how to start thinking mobile first and top the rankings in mobile searches!



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